Boston Marathon Yearly Synopses (1897 - 2013)

First Boston Marathon – Monday, April 19, 1897

John J. McDermott, representing the Pastime Athletic Club from New York City, captured the first running of the Boston Marathon, then known as the B.A.A. Road Race. Fifteen runners started the first race with 10 finishing the 24.5-mile trek from Metcalf’s Mill in Ashland, Massachusetts, to the finish line at the Oval on Irvington Street in downtown Boston. McDermott, who had won the only other marathon on U.S. soil the previous October in New York, took the lead from Harvard athlete Richard Grant over the hills in Newton. Although McDermott walked several times during the final miles, he still won by a comfortable six-minute, 52-second margin in 2:55:10.

1. John J. McDermott (NY) 2:55:10   6. John Mason (NY) 3:31:00
2. James J. Kiernan (NY) 3:02:02 7. W. Ryan (MA) 3:41:25
3. Edward P. Rhell (MA) 3:06:02 8. Lawrence Brignolia (MA) 4:06:12
4. Hamilton Gray (NY) 3:11:37 9. Harry Franklin (MA) 4:08:00
5. H. D. Eggleston (NY) 3:17:50 10. A. T. Howe (MA) 4:10:00

Second Boston Marathon – Tuesday, April 19, 1898

The second running of the B.A.A. Road Race attracted 21 starters and witnessed 15 runners successfully completing the distance. Canadian Ronald J. MacDonald, a 22-year-old Boston College student, who donned bicycle shoes for his first marathon attempt, overtook New York cross-country champion Hamilton Gray with just over two miles remaining, before crossing the line in a triumphant 2:42:00. His time was considered a world-best performance for the marathon at the time. Defending champion John J. McDermott was fourth (2:54:17),

1. Ronald J. MacDonald (CAN) 2:42:00   6. Eugene Estoppey, Jr. (NY) 2:58:49
2. Hamilton Gray (NY) 2:45:00 7. D. J. Grant (NY) 3:08:55
3. Robert A. McLennon (MA) 2:48:02 8. John Mason (NY) 3:09:30
4. John J. McDermott (NY) 2:54:17 9. D. Harrigan (MA) 3:09:30
5. Lawrence Brignolia (MA) 2:55:49 10. J. E. Enwright (NY) 3:16:20

Third Boston Marathon – Wednesday, April 19, 1899

At 173 pounds, Cambridge blacksmith Lawrence Brignolia is the heaviest runner ever to win the Boston Marathon. Brignolia, who seemed suited to tackle the strong gale-like winds that hampered runners the entire way, caught Harvard alumnus Richard Grant on the Newton hills, and finished in 2:54:38. The strength of the winds reportedly caused Brignolia to step on a loose stone and fall during his approach to Kenmore Square. Stopping to regain his composure, Brignolia walked and ran the remaining distance to the new finish line on Exeter Street, in front of the B.A.A. clubhouse.

1. Lawrence Brignolia (MA) 2:54:38   6. Eugene Estoppey, Jr. (NY) 3:18:34
2. Richard Grant (MA) 2:57:46 7. D. J. Sullivan (MA) 3:21:30
3. B. F. Sullivan (MA) 3:02:01 8. J. O. Lynch (NY) 3:23:55
4. John B. Maguire (MA) 3:02:29 9. J. H. Kelly (NY) 3:30:12
5. R. F. Hallen (NY) 3:04:59 10. J. E. Enwright (NY) 3:39:15

Fourth Boston Marathon – Thursday, April 19, 1900

Following the success of Ronald J. MacDonald in 1898, Canadian runners began to establish themselves in the marathon. Led by John P. Caffery of Hamilton, Ontario, the Canadian runners finished 1-2-3 as countrymen Bill Sheering and Fred Hughson followed Caffery across the finish line. Caffery finished in 2:39:44 after overtaking Sheering in Auburndale, 16 miles into the race. The race was marked by the only false start in event history as Canadian John Barnard “jumped the gun” and the runners had to be reassembled at the start.

1. John P. Caffery (CAN) 2:39:44   6. Thomas J. Hicks (MA) 3:07:19
2. William Sheering (CAN) 2:41:31 7. B. F. Sullivan (MA) 3:13:20
3. Fred Hughson (CAN) 2:49:08 8. Richard Grant (MA) 3:13:57
4. John B. Maguire (MA) 2:51:36 9. E. G. Russell, Jr. (NY) Unknown
5. James Fay (MA) 2:55:07 10. Chester Torrance (NY) Unknown

Fifth Boston Marathon – Friday, April 19, 1901

John P. Caffery became the first repeat winner of the Boston Marathon, posting a record time of 2:29:23. Canadian Fred Hughson, who was third the year before, set the early pace only to be caught by Caffery near the halfway mark in Wellesley Square. William Davis, a Mohawk Native American whom Caffery had brought with him from Canada, finished second as 1898 champion Ronald J. MacDonald exited the race at Cleveland Circle. Rumors that MacDonald had been drugged were widely circulated and the topic of much discussion. John Vrazanis, a Greek runner who was eventually forced to drop out due to severe blisters, was the first non-North American to enter the Boston Marathon.

1. John P. Caffery (CAN) 2:29:23   6. Thomas J. Hicks (MA) 2:55:40
2. William Davis (CAN) 2:34:45 7. P. Lorden (MA) 2:55:49
3. Samuel A. Mellor, Jr. (NY) 2:44:34 8. James McAuliffe (MA) 2:56:44
4. C. Crimmins (MA) 2:47:15 9. E. Grusell, Jr. (NY) 3:02:20
5. John C. Lorden (MA) 2:52:32 10. J. J. Kennedy (MA) Unknown

Sixth Boston Marathon – Saturday, April 19, 1902

Samuel A. Mellor, Jr., third the previous year, raced to a relatively easy 2:43:12 victory as two-time defending champion John P. Caffery was forced to withdraw just prior to the start due to dysentery. With a record field of 50 entries (42 starters), Mellor pulled away from 1898 winner Ronald J. MacDonald just over 12 miles into the race and won by two minutes over J. J. Kennedy of Massachusetts. Charlie Moody, a 16-year-old from Brighton High School, finished fourth in 3:03:47.

1. Samuel A. Mellor, Jr. (NY) 2:43:12   6. Ernest Poole (MA) 3:07:14
2. J. J. Kennedy (MA) 2:45:21 7. E. F. O’Brien, Jr. (MA) 3:09:15
3. John C. Lorden (MA) 2:54:49 8. W. H. Hunter (CT) 3:09:50
4. Charlie Moody (MA) 3:03:47 9. J. Flynn (MA) 3:13:15
5. Carl D. Schlobohm (NY) 3:05:49 10. Arthur Ziegler (NY) 3:30:20

Seventh Boston Marathon – Monday, April 20, 1903

Nobody expected Cambridge’s John C. Lorden to win this year, not with the likes of defending champion Samuel A. Mellor, Jr. and two-time champion John P. Caffery set to do battle. Once Lorden put to rest the leg cramps that had bothered him early in the race, he began his pursuit of the two leaders. Caffery withdrew well into the Newton hills. Lorden caught Mellor with less than three miles to go and won by nearly six minutes in 2:41:29.

1. John C. Lorden (MA) 2:41:29   6. Arthur Ziegler (NY) 3:01:53
2. Samuel A. Mellor, Jr. (NY) 2:47:13 7. Edward Fay (MA) 3:04:50
3. Michael Spring (NY) 2:53:01 8. John S. Hunt (MA) 3:06:40
4. Frederick Lorz (NY) 2:53:42 9. John Leadbetter (MA) 3:08:14
5. J. J. Donovan (NY) 3:01:37 10. John P. Coakley (MA) 3:10:47

Eighth Boston Marathon – Tuesday, April 19, 1904

Once again Samuel A. Mellor, Jr. led from the start, but this time it was Michael Spring, the third-place finisher from the previous year, who led the charge over the final miles. Spring, a 21-year-old clerk from New York, had let Mellor build nearly a four-minute lead by the time he had reached 20 miles. As Mellor faded over the final three miles, five runners passed the tired 1902 champion, with Spring hitting the tape in 2:38:04.

1. Michael Spring (NY) 2:38:04   6. Samuel A. Mellor, Jr. (NY) 2:44:43
2. Thomas J. Hicks (MA) 2:39:34 7. J. Easley (MA) 2:46:30
3. Thomas F. Cook (MA) 2:42:35 8. Dennis Bennett (CAN) 2:50:35
4. Carl D. Schlobohm (NY) 2:43:40 9. F. A. Perreault (MA) 2:52:45
5. Frederick Lorz (NY) 2:44:00 10. John S. Hunt (MA) 2:53:15

Ninth Boston Marathon — Wednesday, April 19, 1905

A record field of 84 entrants saw U.S. Olympian Fredrick Lorz run himself into near-exhaustion while winning in 2:38:25. Lorz, who had been accused of cheating the year before in the Olympic Marathon at St. Louis, caught Samuel A. Mellor, Jr. with five miles to go after Mellor had set a record pace throughout the early portion of the race. Defending champion Michael Spring was one of the 78 starters who did not finish.

1. Frederick Lorz (NY)2:38:25 6. David J. Kneeland (MA)2:48:32
2. Louis Marks (NY)2:39:507. Thomas J. Sullivan (MA)2:52:47
3. Robert A. Fowler (MA)2:41:078. John J. Kennedy (MA)2:53:17
4. H. F. Miller (MA)2:42:449. Martin J. O’Neil (MA)2:53:56
5. E. S. Farnsworth (MA)2:43:0110. John S. Hunt (MA)2:54:51

10th Boston Marathon — Thursday, April 19, 1906

The race had its youngest winner ever and closest finish to date as Timothy Ford, an 18-year-old runner from Cambridge, crossed the line in 2:45:45 — a scant six seconds better than Roxbury’s David J. Kneeland. Ford was a post entry, the last on the list of 86 starters. At first, race officials rejected him as an entrant because he had not submitted an application. One mile from the finish, Ford caught the 24-year-old Kneeland and edged ahead. Again, Samuel A. Mellor, Jr. was among the leaders for 13 miles before being overtaken by Kneeland and others at Wellesley Hills.

1. Timothy Ford (MA)2:45:45 6. Martin J. O’Neil (MA)2:56:55
2. David J. Kneeland (MA)2:45:517. Thomas J. Sullivan (MA)3:02:06
3. Thomas P. Morrissey (NY)2:53:418. Ben Mann (CT)3:02:06
4. P. Laffargue (NY)2:53:569. W. R. Prouty (MA)3:07:11
5. John J. Hayes (NY)2:55:3810. Harry Brawley (MA)3:08:11

11th Boston Marathon — Friday, April 19, 1907

Thomas Longboat of the Onandaga First Nations, from Hamilton, Ontario, established a course best in his only Boston appearance. Longboat and Bostonian James J. Lee set a brisk pace that led a contingent of six runners past the railroad crossing in South Framingham. Once past, a freight train blocked the path of the remaining runners, enabling the pack to build an insurmountable lead. Longboat survived the sleet and rain to win by more than three minutes. American John J. Hayes, the 1908 Olympic Marathon gold medalist, was third.

1. Thomas Longboat (CAN)2:24:24 6. Charles E. Petch (CAN)2:36:47
2. Robert A. Fowler (MA)2:27:547. Sidney Hatch (IL)2:37:11
3. John J. Hayes (NY)2:30:388. John Neary (MA)2:37:59
4. James W. O’Mara (MA)2:35:379. John Lindquist (NY)2:38:58
5. James J. Lee (MA)2:36:0410. Carl D. Schlobohm (NY)2:42:02

12th Boston Marathon — Monday, April 20, 1908

New Yorker Thomas P. Morrissey (2:25:43) edged John J. Hayes in a great battle that left only 21 seconds between the two at the finish and saw the first five runners finish within a span of two minutes. Under a bleak sky and accompanied by snow, an early pace was set by Arthur McDonald and New England 10-mile champion Roy Welton of Lawrence, Massachusetts. Morrissey overtook third-place finisher Robert A. Fowler after Cleveland Circle, and Hayes came on strong to capture second in 2:26:04.

1. Thomas P. Morrissey (NY)2:25:43 6. James J. Lee (MA)2:28:34
2. John J. Hayes (NY)2:26:047. Frederick Lorz (NY)2:32:20
3. Robert A. Fowler (MA)2:26:428. Samuel A. Mellor, Jr. (NY)2:41:17
4. Michael J. Ryan (NY)2:27:089. A. Roy Welton (MA)2:43:25
5. W. Wood (MA)2:27:4810. John J. Goff (MA)2:43:54

13th Boston Marathon — Monday, April 19, 1909

Although a record of 164 runners answered the starter’s gun, the biggest story was the heat, which saw the temperature climb to 97 degrees. The intolerable conditions forced 91 entrants to exit early, and allowed the lead to change hands on nine occasions through 20 miles. New Hampshire mill hand Henri Renaud emerged from the fray to claim victory. He passed through Framingham in 53rd place, and, with two miles remaining, passed a weary Harry Jensen. Only Renaud was able to keep running without stopping over the final miles.

1. Henri Renaud (NH)2:53:36 6. Joseph P. McHugh (MA)3:01:52
2. Harry Jensen (NY)2:57:137. Edward G. Ryder (MA)3:02:48
3. Patrick J. Grant (NY)2:57:178. Carl D. Schlobohm (NY)3:06:10
4. James F. Crowley (NY)2:59:429. Edward L. McTiernan (MA)3:08:08
5. Samuel A. Mellor, Jr. (NY)3:00:5310. Robert A. Fowler (MA)3:09:31

14th Boston Marathon — Tuesday, April 19, 1910

Fred S. Cameron from Amherst, Nova Scotia, won the race in 2:28:52 by slipping out front early and was never seriously challenged. This race marked the first appearance of the legendary Clarence H. DeMar, who made a late rush to finish second, one minute behind Cameron. DeMar would go on to win this race a record seven times. Defending champion Henri Renaud was 24th, while 1902 winner Samuel A. Mellor, Jr. finished 34th.

1. Fred S. Cameron (CAN)2:28:52 6. John J. Reynolds (NJ)2:40:03
2. Clarence H. DeMar (MA)2:29:527. R. E. MacCormack (CAN)2:40:25
3. James J. Corkery (CAN)2:34:258. Edwin A. White (NY)2:40:50
4. John R. Roe (CAN)2:38:069. E. P. Devlin (NY)2:41:34
5. Michael J. Ryan (NY)2:38:2410. James Cleary (MA)2:44:58

15th Boston Marathon — Wednesday, April 19, 1911

Clarence H. DeMar, competing against the wishes of doctors who told him not to run due to a heart murmur, smashed Tom Longboat’s course best with a superb 2:21:39 performance. This was the first of DeMar’s seven Boston wins. However, heeding medical advice, he would not compete again until 1917. DeMar trailed Festus Madden by 250 yards, before pulling even through the hills and taking control at Newton Centre.

1. Clarence H. DeMar (MA)2:21:39 6.Daniel Sheridan (VT)2:31:44
2. Festus Madden (MA)2:24:317. Albert Harrop (MA)2:32:31
3. Edouard Fabre (CAN)2:29:228. William Galvin (NY)2:33:10
4. Robert A. Fowler (MA)2:29:319. Michael J. Ryan (NY)2:36:15
5. Richard F. Piggott (MA)2:30:4510. Joseph M. Lorden (MA)2:36:33

16th Boston Marathon — Friday, April 19, 1912

U.S. Olympic-bound marathoner Michael J. Ryan of New York ran through a mud and slush-soaked course to finish first in 2:21:18, shaving 21 seconds off the record DeMar established a year earlier. Ryan was content to let Yale freshman Johnny Gallagher set the early pace. As Gallagher tired near Cleveland Circle, Andrew Sockalexis, a young Native American runner from Old Town, Maine, took over the lead. Ryan caught Sockalexis two miles from the finish and won by 34 seconds.

1. Michael J. Ryan (NY)2:21:18 6. Harry Jensen (NY)2:25:50
2. Andrew Sockalexis (ME)2:21:527. Richard F. Piggott (MA)2:26:07
3. Festus Madden (MA)2:23:248. Edouard Fabre (CAN)2:26:23
4. Thomas H. Lilley (MA)2:23:509. William Galvin (NY)2:26:50
5. Fritz Carlson (MN)2:26:0710. Harry Smith (NY)2:27:46

17th Boston Marathon — Saturday, April 19, 1913

For the second consecutive year, the “Maine Indian” Andrew Sockalexis was the runner-up. Knowing that he had raced too hard in the early going the previous year, Sockalexis let Swedish-born Fritz Carlson set the early pace. Carlson was four minutes ahead of Sockalexis with four miles remaining when the runners hit Cleveland Circle. Carlson held off a valiant rush by Sockalexis over the final few miles to win the race in 2:25:14.

1. Fritz Carlson (MN)2:25:14 6. John Stack (NY)2:33:04
2 Andrew Sockalexis (ME)2:27:127. Joseph M. Lorden (MA)2:33:46
3. Harry Smith (NY)2:19:368. William D. Brown (MA)2:34:00
4. George F. McInerney (PA)2:28:339. George Gaskill (MA)2:35:42
5 Edouard Fabre (CAN)2:31:5110. Anastas K. Sturgis (MA)2:36:13

18th Boston Marathon — Monday, April 20, 1914

The Canadians were again on top as James Duffy from Hamilton, Ontario, defeated countryman Edouard Fabre from Montreal by just 60 yards in 2:25:01. On an overcast and humid day, Fabre wrested the lead from Finnish-born New Yorker Willie Kyronen on what would become known as Heartbreak Hill leading to Boston College. Duffy slowly closed in on Fabre, and the lead changed four times on Beacon Street before Duffy pulled away for the narrow victory.

1. James Duffy (CAN)2:25:01 6. Willie Kyronen (NY)2:34:38
2. Edouard Fabre (CAN)2:25:167. George F. McInerney (PA)2:35:56
3. Joseph M. Lorden (MA)2:28:428. Fritz Carlson (MN)2:37:19
4. Walter Bell (CAN)2:30:379. Thomas H. Lilley (MA)2:38:53
5. Arthur V. Roth (MA)2:31:0810. Festus Madden (MA)2:38:57

19th Boston Marathon — Monday, April 19, 1915

On another unseasonably warm day, French-Canadian Edouard Fabre overcame the 84-degree temperature to win in 2:31:41. With one-third of the starters dropping out, Fabre, who finished second the year before, ran behind the lead runners in the early going and did not take the lead until Kenmore Square, one mile from the finish. Fabre passed Cliff Horne, a Haverhill, Massachusetts, resident who had taken over the lead with just 2.3 miles remaining. Horne began to tire from the effects of the intense heat, and Fabre ran past him for the victory.

1. Edouard Fabre (CAN)2:31:41 6. George F. McInerney (PA)2:38:14
2. Clifton G. Horne (MA)2:33:017. Percy Wyer (NY)2:45:16
3. Sidney H. Hatch (IL)2:35:478. Fred Travalena (NY)2:46:58
4. Hugh Honohan (NY)2:37:029. John M. Mullen (NY)2:50:02
5. Edward L. Byrne (NY)2:37:1510. Alfred G. Horne (MA)2:51:36

20th Boston Marathon — Wednesday, April 19, 1916

Local boy Arthur V. Roth of Roxbury ran a triumphant 2:27:16 to become the first Boston resident to win the race. The 23-year-old draftsman broke from the field at 10 miles and built a three-minute, 17-second lead as the runners headed into the Newton hills. Runner-up Willie Kyronen of New York put on a late burst over the final six miles, but was still 11 seconds shy at the finish. Completely exhausted, Roth collapsed as he breasted the tape and had to be assisted from the finish area by race officials.

1. Arthur V. Roth (MA)2:27:16 6. William J. (Bill) Kennedy (IL)2:35:17
2. Willie Kyronen (NY)2:27:277. John P. Phillips (NY)2:39:39
3. Sidney H. Hatch (IL)2:28:308. Arthur Lee Jamieson (CAN)2:41:09
4. James J. Corkery (CAN)2:30:349. Michael J. Lynch (DC)2:41:22
5. William Brown (MA)2:34:1810. George B. Moss (NY)2:43:39

21st Boston Marathon — Thursday, April 19, 1917

New York bricklayer Bill Kennedy stunned a highly competitive field that included Finnish favorites Hannes Kolehmainen and Willie Kyronen. The oldest winner of the race to date at age 35, Kennedy overtook the Finns at the halfway juncture in Wellesley. He withstood a brief challenge from Hans Schuster at Newton Lower Falls, before claiming victory in 2:28:37 over runner-up Sidney H. Hatch. The race marked the reappearance of Clarence H. DeMar, who ran for the first time since his victory in the 1911 race and placed third in 2:31:05.

1. William J. (Bill) Kennedy (NY)2:28:37 6. Hans Schuster (NY)2:37:28
2. Sidney H. Hatch (IL)2:30:197. Carl W. A. Linder (MA)2:38:38
3. Clarence H. DeMar (MA)2:31:058. Michael J. Lynch (DC)2:40:06
4. Hannes Kolehmainen (NY)2:31:589. Prescot M. Dean (NY)2:44:28
5. Charles G. Mellor (IL)2:36:2010. Leroy Davis (MA)2:44:28

22nd Boston Marathon — Friday, April 19, 1918

Due to American involvement in World War I, the traditional Patriots’ Day race underwent a change of format. A 10-man military relay race was contested on the course, and a team from Camp Devens in Ayer, Massachusetts, bested the field in 2:24:53.

1. Camp Devens Divisional Team2:24:53 6. 304th Infantry, Camp Devens2:32:20
2. 302nd Infantry, Camp Devens2:28:107. Bumkin Island2:37:20
3. Boston Navy Yard2:28:458. U. S. N. Radio School2:44:26
4. 301st Signal Battalion, Camp Devens2:29:14
5. Naval Cadet School2:29:23

23rd Boston Marathon — Saturday, April 19, 1919

Another local runner took home top honors as the race returned to its traditional format following the war. Quincy’s Carl W. A. Linder, the New England javelin and decathlon champion, who had been rejected for military service because of flat feet, was victorious in 2:29:13. With less than two-and-a-half miles remaining, Linder passed Chicago’s Frank Gillespie, who had led from the Natick checkpoint. Gillespie, his feet a mass of blisters and blood from his new racing shoes, could not respond to Linder’s challenge. Runner-up William Wick, at 4 feet, 10.5 inches, was the shortest person to finish the Boston course to date.

1. Carl W. A. Linder (MA)2:29:13 6. Aaron Morris (NY)2:37:31
2. William Wick (MA)2:30:157. Peter Trivoulidas (GRE)2:38:10
3. Otto J. Laakso (NY)2:31:318. Runar Ohman (SWE)2:41:38
4. Frank Gillespie (IL)2:36:449. Anastas K. Sturgis (MA)2:51:15
5. Michael J. Lynch (DC)2:36:5810. Henry Kanto (MA)2:51:53

24th Boston Marathon – Monday, April 19, 1920

Greek national Peter Trivoulidas, a New York busboy, was running in eighth place, three minutes behind leader James P. Henigan, as he entered the Newton hills. Meanwhile, 1916 winner Arthur V. Roth of Roxbury overtook Henigan, who was beset with cramps and eventually withdrew from the race. Roth again tried to steal the race by building up a large lead. However, when he again began to falter near Kenmore Square, Trivoulidas surged and easily overtook Roth to win in 2:29:31.

1. Peter Trivoulidas (GRE) 2:29:31   6. Robert Conboy (NY) 2:37:34
2. Arthur V. Roth (MA) 2:30:31 7. Frank Zuna (NJ) 2:39:34
3. Carl W. A. Linder (MA) 2:33:22 8. Clifton Mitchell (NY) 2:41:43
4. William Wick (MA) 2:34:37 9. John Tuomikoski (MA) 2:43:06
5. Edwin H. White (NY) 2:36:10 10. Runar Ohman (SWE) 2:43:41

25th Boston Marathon – Tuesday, April 19, 1921

New Jersey plumber Frank T. Zuna smashed the course record of 1912 winner Michael J. Ryan with a powerful 2:18:57 performance, upsetting defending champion Peter Trivoulidas, who finished third. Zuna and eventual second-place finisher Chuck Mellor formed a two-member lead pack through 16 miles. Zuna surged on the first of the Newton hills, and ran uncontested to the finish.

1. Frank T. Zuna (NY) 2:18:57   6. Edouard Fabre (CAN) 2:31:34
2. Charles L. (Chuck) Mellor (IL) 2:22:12 7. Willie Kyronen (NY) 2:32:36
3. Peter Trivoulidas (GRE) 2:27:41 8. Otto J. Laakso (NY) 2:33:39
4. Carl W. A. Linder (MA) 2:28:02 9. John Goff (NY) 2:37:35
5. Albert R. Michelson (CT) 2:30:35 10. Robert Conboy (NY) 2:38:18

26th Boston Marathon – Wednesday, April 19, 1922

Clarence H. DeMar, who captured his first title in 1911, added his second crown and officially commenced his reign of dominance. From 1922 to 1930, DeMar would win the race six times, including a string of three straight wins (1922–24). At age 33, DeMar established a permanent record (2:18:10) for the 24.5-mile course, which was abandoned two years later in favor of the standard 26-mile, 385-yard Olympic distance. Medford’s James P. Henigan battled DeMar from mile seven through 20, but DeMar was able to pull away on the downhill past Boston College, where Henigan dropped out.

1. Clarence H. DeMar (MA) 2:18:10   6. Otto J. Laakso (NY) 2:24:45
2. Willie Ritola (NY) 2:21:44 7. Carl W. A. Linder (MA) 2:25:29
3. Albert Smoke (CAN) 2:22:49 8. Frank T. Zuna (NY) 2:26:26
44. Victor MacAuley (CAN) 2:24:02 9. Harvey Frick (NY) 2:28:16
5. Willie Kyronen (NY) 2:24:42 10. Edouard Fabre (CAN) 2:29:00

27th Boston Marathon – Thursday, April 19, 1923

This was the second of Clarence H. DeMar’s three consecutive wins (2:23:47) and the last race at the 24.5- mile distance. After taking the lead from Albert R. Michelson at Cleveland Circle, DeMar held off the late challenge of 1921 winner Frank T. Zuna. Wallie R. Carlson of Chicago closed fast over the latter stages of the race to finish third, ahead of the fading Michelson.

1. Clarence H. DeMar (MA) 2:23:47   6. Nestor Erickson (NY 2:29:46
2. Frank T. Zuna (NY) 2:25:30 7. Carl W. A. Linder (MA) 2:30:03
3. Wallie R. Carlson (IL) 2:27:10 8. William J. (Bill) Kennedy (NY) 2:33:47
4. Albert R. Michelson (CT) 2:28:27 9. Joseph Conto (NY) 2:38:20
5. Gunnar Nilson (NY) 2:29:40 10. Arthur L. Flanders (MA) 2:40:41

28th Boston Marathon – Saturday, April 19, 1924

Completing a three-year sweep, Clarence H. DeMar (2:29:40) simply outran the field and finished more than five minutes ahead of Chuck Mellor. The race course was lengthened to what was thought to be 26 miles, 385 yards, in order to comply with the standard Olympic Marathon distance. However, upon remeasuring in 1927, the course was found to be 197 yards short of the official distance.

1. Clarence H. DeMar (MA) 2:29:40   6. Victor MacAuley (CAN) 2:40:36
2. Charles L. (Chuck) Mellor (IL) 2:35:04 7. Ralph A. Williams (MA) 2:41:58
3. Frank E. Wendling (NY) 2:37:40 8. William J. (Bill) Kennedy (NY) 2:43:03
4. William J. Churchill (CA) 2:37:05 9. Louis Tikkanen (NY) 2:46:31
5. Carl W. A. Linder (MA) 2:40:12 10. Sporos N. Merageas (NY) 2:50:49

29th Boston Marathon – Monday, April 20, 1925

Chuck Mellor of Chicago succeeded in his fifth Boston attempt, winning the race in 2:33:00 and spoiling Clarence H. DeMar’s bid for a fourth consecutive title. Running with a wad of tobacco tucked inside his cheek and the morning edition of the Boston Globe placed inside the front of his shirt to serve as a windbreaker, Mellor finally pulled away from DeMar on Beacon Street, within two miles of the finish.

1. Charles L. (Chuck) Mellor (IL) 2:33:00   6. Willie Kyronen (NY) 2:40:36
2. Clarence H. DeMar (MA) 2:33:37 7. Victor MacAuley (CAN) 2:42:14
3. Frank T. Zuna (NJ) 2:35:25 8. Nestor Erickson (NY) 2:43:08
4. Albert R. Michelson (NY) 2:37:22 9. William J. (Bill) Kennedy (NY) 2:43:46
5. Karl Koski (NY) 2:39:26 10. Frank E. Wendling (NY) 2:48:59

30th Boston Marathon – Monday, April 19, 1926

A 20-year-old delivery boy, John C. Miles of Sydney Mines, Nova Scotia, upset Olympic champion Albin Stenroos of Finland and course recordholder Clarence H. DeMar. Miles ran in dogged pursuit of Stenroos, and finally caught the Olympic gold medalist at Boston College. Slowed by a side stitch, Stenroos could only watch as Miles darted past en route to a course-best 2:25:40.

1. John C. Miles (CAN) 2:25:40†   6. Karl Koski (NY) 2:41:22
2. Albin Stenroos (FIN) 2:29:40 7. Nestor Erickson (NY) 2:42:35
3. Clarence H. DeMar (MA) 2:32:15 8. William J. (Bill) Kennedy (NY) 2:44:01
4. Albert R. Michelson (NY) 2:34:03 9. J. Foxcraft Carleton (MA) 2:44:20
5. Wallie Carlson (MA) 2:40:35 10. Arthur R. Scholes (CAN) 2:48:14

31st Boston Marathon – Tuesday, April 19, 1927

Although the course was lengthened to the full marathon distance of 26 miles, 385 yards, the finish was familiar as Clarence H. DeMar claimed his fifth title in 2:40:22. Just shy of his 39th birthday and running in 82-degree heat, DeMar led at every checkpoint along the course. John C. Miles, the defending champion, was forced to withdraw from the race at seven miles, suffering from the heat. This year’s race served as the AAU championship.

1. Clarence H. DeMar (MA) 2:40:22†   6. Edouard Fabre (CAN) 3:06:12
2. Karl Koski (NY) 2:44:41 7. Harvey Frick (NY) 3:07:10
3. William J. (Bill) Kennedy (NY) 2:51:58 8. Thomas Bury (MA) 3:12:33
4. Clifford Bricker (CAN) 3:00:54 9. Frank DiMaggio (MA) 3:14:57
5. Carl W. A. Linder (MA) 3:02:21 10. George Duncan (MA) 3:17:46

32nd Boston Marathon – Thursday, April 19, 1928

Aggressive racing by Clarence H. DeMar once again resulted in back-to-back victories and his sixth win as the field grew to 285 entrants. DeMar took over in Natick, 10 miles into the race, with Philadelphia’s Bill Wilson nipping at his heels until 18.5 miles. DeMar slowly pulled away, and crossed the line in 2:37:07, while celebrated miler Joie W. Ray finished third.

1. Clarence H. DeMar (MA) 2:37:07†   6. Carl W. A. Linder (MA) 2:50:13
2. James P. Henigan (MA) 2:41:01 7. William Wilson (PA) 2:51:02
3. Joie W. Ray (IL) 2:41:56 8. Leo Giard (MA) 2:51:11
4. J. K. Mullan (PA) 2:46:54 9. Charles E. Cahill (MA) 2:52:02
5. Harvey Frick (NY) 2:48:28 10. Silas McLellan (CAN) 2:52:56

† Course Record

33rd Boston Marathon – Friday, April 19, 1929

John C. Miles, the 1926 champion, returned with a course-record performance of 2:33:08. The 23-year-old Miles, who did not participate in the 1928 race to concentrate on the Olympic Games, waged a tough battle with Albert R. Michelson from miles 13 through 23 before pulling away on Beacon Street. Finnish runners Karl Koski and Willie Kyronen closed fast to catch Michelson in the final miles.

1. John C. Miles (CAN) 2:33:08†   6. William Taylor (CAN) 2:40:05
2. Karl Koski (NY) 2:35:26 7. Gabriel Ruotsalainen (CAN) 2:41:06
3. Willie Kyronen (NY) 2:35:44 8. Ronald O’Toole (CAN) 2:43:07
4. Albert R. Michelson (NY) 2:37:22 9. Clarence H. DeMar (MA) 2:43:47
5. Jack Lamb (MA) 2:39:25 10. Fred Ward, Jr. (NY) 2:44:13

† Course Record

34th Boston Marathon – Saturday, April 19, 1930

Clarence H. DeMar chalked up his seventh and final victory in 2:34:48 on a hot and humid afternoon. At age 41, DeMar became the oldest runner ever to win Boston. After following pacesetter Hans Oldag of Buffalo for 16 miles, DeMar asserted himself with a powerful surge through the Newton hills. He slowed in the final miles, thereby losing his bid for a course record, but easily finished ahead of runner-up Willie Kyronen.

1. Clarence H. DeMar (MA) 2:34:48   6. Ronald B. O’Toole (CAN) 2:41:55
2. Willie Kyronen (NY) 2:36:27 7. John D. (Jock) Semple (SCO) 2:44:29
3. Karl Koski (NY) 2:38:21 8. James P. Henigan (MA) 2:46:38
4. Harold Webster (CAN) 2:39:27 9. Silas McLellan (CAN) 2:50:49
5. Gabriel Ruotsalainen (CAN) 2:41:05 10. Gordon A. Norman (MA) 2:53:17

35th Boston Marathon – Monday, April 20, 1931

The Medford, Massachusetts, milkman, James P. Henigan, enjoyed his long-awaited victory in his 10th Boston attempt with a time of 2:46:45. Henigan, one of the nation’s leading cross-country and 10-mile runners, had finished second in 1928 but had dropped out in eight of his nine previous attempts. He spent much of the day dueling with Canada’s Dave Komonen, before taking control in the hills and racing uncontested over the final miles.

1. James P. Henigan (MA) 2:46:45   6. Percy Wyer (CAN) 2:56:01
2. Fred Ward, Jr. (NY) 2:49:03 7. Dave Komonen (CAN) 2:58:31
3. Karl Koski (NY) 2:53:27 8. Paul De Bruyn (GER) 2:59:09
4. David Fagerlund (NY) 2:53:41 9. Gordon A. Norman (MA) 3:03:33
5. Clarence H. DeMar (NH) 2:55:46 10. John C. Miles (CAN) 3:04:56

36th Boston Marathon – Tuesday, April 19, 1932

Paul De Bruyn, a 24-year-old former sailor in the German Navy, outraced defending champion James P. Henigan on Beacon Street to win in 2:33:36. The 39-year-old Henigan, who crossed the line just 56 seconds behind De Bruyn, followed the record-setting pace of Canada’s John McLeod. Blisters caused McLeod to falter entering Cleveland Circle, and set the stage for the stretch run between De Bruyn and Henigan.

1. Paul De Bruyn (GER) 2:33:36   6. Alex Burnside (CAN) 2:39:42
2. James P. Henigan (MA) 2:34:32 7. Earle L. Collins (MA) 2:40:59
3. Willie Kyronen (NY) 2:34:55 8. Leslie S. Pawson (RI) 2:41:36
4. Albert R. Michelson (NY) 2:36:23 9. Eddy Cudworth (CAN) 2:42:32
5. William Steiner (NY) 2:38:46 10. John D. (Jock) Semple (SCO) 2:43:07

37th Boston Marathon – Wednesday, April 19, 1933

Pawtucket, Rhode Island, mill weaver Leslie S. Pawson scored the first of his three Boston wins with a convincing 2:31:01 record performance into a strong headwind. Pawson grabbed the lead from New Yorker John DeGloria on the first of the Newton hills, and went on to win by almost five-and-a-half minutes over Canada’s Dave Komonen.

1. Leslie S. Pawson (RI) 2:31:01†   6. Albert R. Michelson (NY) 2:40:27
2. Dave Komonen (CAN) 2:36:27 7. Walter T. Hornby (CAN) 2:41:32
3. Richard Wilding (CAN) 2:38:00 8. Clarence H. DeMar (NH) 2:43:18
4. Harold Webster (CAN) 2:38:31 9. John DeGloria (NY) 2:43:20
5. Willie Kyronen (NY) 2:39:50 10. Hugo Kauppinen (NY) 2:46:01

† Course Record

38th Boston Marathon – Thursday, April 19, 1934

Finnish-born cobbler Dave Komonen of Ontario prepared for the race by making his own running shoes. Heavily favored in an anticipated duel with defender Leslie S. Pawson, Komonen took the lead from New York’s William Steiner at 13 miles and Pawson dropped out two miles later. The next eight miles saw the emergence of a young runner, a florist’s assistant from Arlington by the name of John A. Kelley. The local lad exchanged the lead with Komonen several times before the Canadian pulled ahead for good at Cleveland Circle en route to a 2:32:53 victory. This was the first of Kelley’s seven second-place finishes at Boston.

1. Dave Komonen (CAN) 2:32:53   6. Gordon A. Norman (MA) 2:45:00
2. John A. Kelley (MA) 2:36:50 7. William F. McMahon (MA) 2:45:19
3. William Steiner (NY) 2:40:29 8. Percy Wyer (CAN) 2:46:06
4. Alex Burnside (CAN) 2:44:32 9. David Fagerlund (NY) 2:48:08
5. Karl Koski (NY) 2:44:52 10. William P. Molloy (MA) 2:48:56

39th Boston Marathon – Friday, April 19, 1935

Runner-up the previous year, John A. Kelley roared to an impressive first-place finish in 2:32:07. Kelley took the lead in Wellesley, while defender Dave Komonen dropped out shortly thereafter. On his way to a twominute, four-second victory over Pat Dengis of Maryland, Kelley stopped briefly one mile from the finish in Kenmore Square, overcome with nausea. He ran the final mile to victory.

1. John A. Kelley (MA) 2:32:07   6. Earle L. Collins (MA) 2:44:39
2. Pat Dengis (MD) 2:34:11 7. Joseph W. Plouffe (RI) 2:44:57
3. Richard Wilding (CAN) 2:39:50 8. Fred Ward, Jr. (NY) 2:46:08
4. Gordon A. Norman (MA) 2:40:57 9. Vic Callard (CAN) 2:46:51
5. Hugo Kauppinen (NY) 2:44:33 10. Andre J. Brunelle (MA) 2:47:23

40th Boston Marathon – Monday, April 20, 1936

So fast was the early pace set by Ellison "Tarzan" M. Brown, that he beat the press vehicles and writers to the first checkpoint in Framingham. Brown, a Narragansett Native American from Alton, Rhode Island, held the lead through the Newton hills where he was caught by a charging John A. Kelley, who put on a swift rush over the hills. As Kelley prepared to pass Brown, he patted him on the backside. The gesture seemed to inspire Brown, who surged to victory in 2:33:40, while Kelley faded to fifth. Noting the incident, Boston Globe sports editor Jerry Nason coined the term “Heartbreak Hill” as the site of Kelley's misery.

1. Ellison M. Brown (RI) 2:33:40   6. Alex Burnside (CAN) 2:39:05
2. William F. McMahon (MA) 2:35:27 7. Earle L. Collins (MA) 2:39:49
3. Mel Porter (NY) 2:36:48 8. Anthony J. Paskell (MA) 2:40:07
4. Leo Giard (MA) 2:37:16 9. Vic Callard (CAN) 2:40:25
5. John A. Kelley (MA) 2:38:49 10. James M. Shaw (CAN) 2:42:38

41st Boston Marathon – Monday, April 19, 1937

An unemployed snowshoe racer from Quebec, Walter Young, battled John A. Kelley for 23 miles on an unseasonably warm day. The lead changed hands 16 times, before Young pulled away to post the victory in 2:33:20. Kelley fell off the pace and finished second, nearly six minutes behind.

1. Walter Young (CAN) 2:33:20   6. Hugo Kauppinen (NY) 2:46:06
2. John A. Kelley (MA) 2:39:02 7. Gerard A. Cote (CAN) 2:46:46
3. Leslie S. Pawson (RI) 2:41:46 8. Joseph W. Plouffe (MA) 2:46:53
4. Fred Ward, Jr. (NY) 2:42:59 9. John D. (Jock) Semple (MA) 2:48:13
5. Duncan McCallum (CAN) 2:43:16 10. Leo Giard (MA) 2:48:13

42nd Boston Marathon – Tuesday, April 19, 1938

Leslie S. Pawson notched his second Boston win five years after setting the record in the 1933 race. The 75- degree temperature made this a race of attrition. A patient Pawson let Canada’s Duncan McCallum force the early pace, and later yielded to John A. Kelley from miles eight through 15. Pawson took the lead for good through Newton Lower Falls and finished first in 2:35:34, a comfortable 66 seconds ahead of the fast-closing Pat Dengis.

1. Leslie S. Pawson (RI) 2:35:34   6. Mike Mansulla (MA) 2:42:30
2. Pat Dengis (NY) 2:36:40 7. Clarence H. DeMar (NH) 2:43:30
3. John A. Kelley (MA) 2:37:34 8. Gerard A. Cote (CAN) 2:44:01
4. Mel Porter (NY) 2:39:55 9. Walter Hornby (CAN) 2:44:39
5. Paul Donato (MA) 2:42:05 10. Fred Ward, Jr. (NY) 2:47:14

43rd Boston Marathon – Wednesday, April 19, 1939

Ellison M. Brown, the 1936 winner, registered his second win in a course-best 2:28:51. Brown shattered Leslie S. Pawson’s former mark of 2:31:01 and became the first American marathoner to run in under two hours, 30 minutes. Brown allowed Pawson and 1937 winner Walter Young to force the early pace, before commandeering the race at the 17-mile mark, and breaking every existing checkpoint record.

1. Ellison M. Brown (RI) 2:28:51†   6. Paul Donato (MA) 2:34:25
2. Don Heinicke (MD) 2:31:24 7. Walter Hornby (CAN) 2:37:11
3. Walter Young (CAN) 2:32:41 8. Gerard A. Cote (CAN) 2:37:43
4. Pat Dengis (NY) 2:33:22 9. Frederick Bristow (CAN) 2:38:44
5. Leslie S. Pawson (RI) 2:33:57 10. Andre J. Brunelle (MA) 2:39:09

† Course Record

44th Boston Marathon – Friday, April 19, 1940

This was the first of Gerard A. Cote’s four Boston wins in the 1940s. The French-Canadian ran through the halfway juncture in Wellesley tucked in 15th place. It wasn’t until mile 22 on Beacon Street that he caught the leader, John A. Kelley. Cote outran Kelley to the finish in 2:28:28, breaking Ellison M. Brown’s year-old record by 23 seconds.

1. Gerard A. Cote (CAN) 2:28:28†   6. Andre J. Brunelle (MA) 2:35:20
2. John A. Kelley (MA) 2:32:03 7. Robert S. Rankine (CAN) 2:37:44
3. Don Heinicke (MD) 2:32:21 8. Fred A. McGlone (MA) 2:37:49
4. Leslie S. Pawson (RI) 2:33:09 9. George L. Durgin (MA) 2:38:21
5. Paul Donato (MA) 2:34:54 10. Frank M. Darrah (MA) 2:43:38

† Course Record

45th Boston Marathon – Saturday, April 19, 1941

Leslie S. Pawson captured his third Boston win with his fastest time (2:30:38) on a balmy 72-degree day. Pawson, now 36, trailed former champions Gerard A. Cote, John A. Kelley, and Ellison M. Brown during the early miles. When Pawson made his move, only Kelley responded. The duo matched strides from miles 10 through 21, before Pawson pulled away at Lake Street. Crossing the line 48 seconds after Pawson, Kelley was runner-up for the fourth time in eight years.

1. Leslie S. Pawson (RI) 2:30:38   6. Fred A. McGlone (MA) 2:40:44
2. John A. Kelley (MA) 2:31:26 7. Andre J. Brunelle (MA) 2:43:28
3. Don Heinicke (MD) 2:35:40 8. John D. (Jock) Semple (MA) 2:47:26
4. Gerard A. Cote (CAN) 2:37:59 9. Paul Donato (MA) 2:49:02
5. Bernard Joseph (Joe) Smith (MA) 2:40:32 10. Joe Kleinerman (NY) 2:50:48

46th Boston Marathon – Sunday, April 19, 1942

Benefiting from a cold, 44-degree day, Medford milkman Bernard Joseph (Joe) Smith smashed Gerard A. Cote’s course mark and established an American record with a stunning 2:26:51. At 6 feet, 2 inches, Smith was the tallest runner ever to win the race until this time. Smith was ill the morning of the race and had to be talked into running by his wife. He grabbed the lead from runner-up Louis P. Gregory past the 21-mile mark, and forced the pace to the finish to eclipse the former record.

1. Bernard Joseph (Joe) Smith (MA) 2:26:51†*   6. Gerard A. Cote (CAN) 2:39:59
2. Louis P. Gregory (NY) 2:28:03 7. William Steiner (NY) 2:40:42
3. Carl Maroney (MA) 2:36:13 8. Michael J. O’Hara (NY) 2:41:08
4. Don Heinicke (MD) 2:37:24 9. Lloyd Bairstow (MA) 2:41:55
5. John A. Kelley (MA) 2:37:55 10. Joe Kleinerman (NY) 2:45:51

† Course Record
* American Record

47th Boston Marathon – Monday, April 19, 1943

The first of two thrilling encounters between former champions Gerard A. Cote and John A. Kelley witnessed the pair running together for 21 miles. Although burdened by a strained Achilles tendon, Cote began to pull away entering Brookline and registered his second triumph in 2:28:25.

1. Gerard A. Cote (CAN) 2:28:25   6. Don Heinicke (MD) 2:38:52
2. John A. Kelley (MA) 2:30:00 7. William Wicklund (NJ) 2:41:46
3. Fred A. McGlone (MA) 2:30:41 8. Anthony Medeiros (MA) 2:44:17
4. Lloyd Bairstow (MA) 2:33:47 9. Louis Young (MA) 2:44:44
5. Leslie S. Pawson (RI) 2:35:58 10. Michael O’Hara (NY) 2:46:14

48th Boston Marathon – Wednesday, April 19, 1944

The much-anticipated rematch between Gerard A. Cote and John A. Kelley lived up to expectations, and resulted in the third-closest finish to this point in race history. While Cote spent the afternoon in the lead pack, Kelley slowly worked his way to the front. Kelley finally caught Cote beyond Washington Square on Beacon Street, but Cote refused to yield sole possession of the lead. Seven times Kelley surged and seven times Cote answered. Finally, with less than a half-mile remaining, Cote surged and Kelley had no response. It was Cote’s third title (2:31:50) and Kelley’s sixth second-place finish.

1. Gerard A. Cote (CAN) 2:31:50   6. Don Heinicke (MD) 2:47:52
2. John A. Kelley (MA) 2:32:03 7. Bruno Mazzeo (ME) 2:49:06
3. Charles Robbins, Jr. (NY) 2:38:31 8. Louis Young (MA) 2:49:18
4. William Wicklund (NY) 2:41:45 9. John D. (Jock) Semple (MA) 2:51:34
5. Lloyd Evans (CAN) 2:43:20 10. Clayton Farrar (NY) 2:54:40

49th Boston Marathon – Thursday, April 19, 1945

The 37-year-old John A. Kelley returned to the winner’s circle for the first time in 10 years with a triumphant 2:30:40. Similar to his strategy of a year ago, Kelley was not among the early leaders, but slowly worked his way to the front. He caught guardsman Lloyd Bairstow in Coolidge Corner and accelerated to a two-minute, 10-second margin of victory at the finish.

1. John A. Kelley (MA) 2:30:40   6. Charles Robbins, Jr. (NY) 2:39:51
2. Lloyd Bairstow (MA) 2:32:50 7. Louis Young (MA) 2:40:22
3. Don Heinicke (MD) 2:36:28 8. Anthony Medeiros (MA) 2:41:04
4. Robert Rankine (CAN) 2:38:03 9. John D. (Jock) Semple (MA) 2:47:36
5. Lloyd Evans (CAN) 2:39:43 10. Ab Morton (CAN) 2:49:55

50th Boston Marathon – Saturday, April 20, 1946

The late Boston Globe sports editor Jerry Nason, the person responsible for documenting most of the written history of the Boston Marathon, called this the most significant race of all time. Running to dramatize the plight of his starving countrymen, Greek marathoner Stylianos Kyriakides hung gallantly onto John A. Kelley and ran him down in the late stages of the race. The race was also significant because it heralded the dominance of foreign runners in future years. This was the final year that the large contingent of race vehicles was allowed on the course. In 1947, B.A.A. president Walter Brown would allow only three press buses along the route.

1. Stylianos Kyriakides (GRE) 2:29:27   6. John Kersnason (NY) 2:41:20
2. John A. Kelley (MA) 2:31:27 7. Lloyd Evans (CAN) 2:43:02
3. Gerard A. Cote (CAN) 2:36:34 8. Charles A. Robbins, Jr. (NY) 2:43:59
4. Louis P. Gregory (NY) 2:37:23 9. Theodore J. Vogel (MA) 2:44:24
5. Ab Morton (CAN) 2:38:54 10. Louis Young (MA) 2:44:38

51st Boston Marathon – Saturday, April 19, 1947

Korean Yun Bok Suh ran a world-best 2:25:39, marking the only time the men’s world record has been set on the Boston Marathon course. Suh, who was also the first Asian champion, and, at 5 feet, 1 inch, the shortest Boston champion to date, received funds from American servicemen to cover the cost of his trip to Boston. After overcoming a fall caused by a stray fox terrier, Suh took the lead from Finland’s Mikko Hietanen on the last of the Newton hills and ran unchallenged to the finish.

1. Yun Bok Suh (KOR) 2:25:39#   6. Athanasios Ragazos (GRE) 2:35:34
2. Mikko Hietanen (FIN) 2:29:39 7. Sevki Koru (TUR) 2:37:50
3. Theodore J. Vogel (MA) 2:30:10 8. E. David Mazzeo (ME) 2:38:03
4. Gerard A. Cote (CAN) 2:32:11 9. Viano Muinonen (FIN) 2:38:59
5. Ab Morton (CAN) 2:33:08 10. Stylianos Kyriakides (GRE) 2:39:13

# World Record

52nd Boston Marathon – Monday, April 19, 1948

The fourth and final of Gerard A. Cote’s victories was earned following a hard-fought battle with Theodore J. Vogel, of Watertown, Massachusetts. Following an elbow-to-elbow duel during the first 23 miles — that on occasion bordered on the unsportsmanlike — Cote pulled away for a 44-second margin of victory in 2:31:02.

1. Gerard A. Cote (CAN) 2:31:02   6. Lloyd Evans (CAN) 2:41:05
2. Theodore J. Vogel (MA) 2:31:46 7. Walter Fedorick (CAN) 2:41:23
3. Jesse H. Van Zant (MA) 2:36:53 8. Luis Velasquez (GUA) 2:41:27
4. John A. Kelley (MA) 2:37:52 9. E. David Mazzeo (ME) 2:43:15
5. Ollie Manninen (MA) 2:39:59 10. Warren Dupree (USA) 2:43:42

53rd Boston Marathon – Tuesday, April 19, 1949

Unsure about his fitness, Sweden’s Karl Gosta Leandersson ran over the course 10 days before the race, unofficially breaking the course record and injuring his Achilles tendon in the process. But the Swedish champion recovered in time to post a two-minute, 52-second win in 2:31:50 over Victor Dyrgall. Leandersson’s lone scare came not in the form of another runner, but from a car which nearly sideswiped him as it unexpectedly entered the course in Auburndale (Newton) prior to the turn onto Commonwealth Avenue.

1. Karl Gosta Leandersson (SWE) 2:31:50   6. Gerard A. Cote (CAN) 2:42:55
2. Victor Dyrgall (NY) 2:34:42 7. Fran Austin (MA) 2:43:28
3. Louis White (MA) 2:36:48 8. Tom Jones (PA) 2:44:05
4. John A. Kelley (MA) 2:38:07 9. Andrew Neiding (NY) 2:44:31
5. Joe Smith (FL) 2:38:30 10. Paul Collins (NY) 2:45:11

54th Boston Marathon – Wednesday, April 19, 1950

The extent of the foreign dominance began to deepen as the Korean contingent of Ki-Yong Ham, Ki Yoon Song, and Yun Chi Choi finished 1-2-3, respectively. Nicknamed “Swift Premium” by the race writers, Ham was ranked only third on the Korean team, behind their national champion and Olympian Choi. However, Ham, who built an overwhelming advantage between miles 12 and 21, walked four times along the final four miles, before finishing first in 2:32:39.

1. Ki-Yong Ham (KOR) 2:32:39   6. Anthony Medeiros (MA) 2:47:15
2. Kil Yoon Song (KOR) 2:35:58 7. Lloyd Bairstow (MA) 2:49:46
3. Yun Chi Choi (KOR) 2:39:47 8. Paul Collins (NY) 2:50:12
4. John Lafferty (MA) 2:39:52 9. Edo Romognoli (NY) 2:52:50
5. John A. Kelley (MA) 2:43:45 10. Kenneth O’Connell (OH) 2:56:42

55th Boston Marathon – Thursday, April 19, 1951

Japan’s 19-year-old Shigeki Tanaka upset his favored countrymen and Greek national champion Athanasios Ragazos to win. One of the race’s youngest winners, Tanaka — a Hiroshima native — provided an exciting and swift run over the Newton hills to finish three minutes, 30 seconds ahead of American John Lafferty (2:31:15).

1. Shigeki Tanaka (JPN) 2:27:45   6. John A. Kelley (MA) 2:39:09
2. John Lafferty (MA) 2:31:15 7. Gerard A. Cote (CAN) 2:41:15
3. Athanasios Ragazos (GRE) 2:35:27 8. Yoshitaka Uchikawa (JPN) 2:41:31
4. Louis White (NY) 2:35:53 9. Hiromi Haigo (JPN) 2:42:23
5. Shunji Koyanagi (JPN) 2:38:36 10. Jesse Van Zant (MA) 2:43:35

56th Boston Marathon – Saturday, April 19, 1952

On a scorching 88-degree day, Indian runner Doroteo Flores of Guatemala survived the wretched conditions to win by almost five minutes in 2:31:53. Flores, a laborer in a Guatemala mill, took the lead from countryman Luis Velasquez near the 10-mile mark in Natick. Appearing undaunted by the oppressive heat and humidity, Flores breezed through the remainder of the route to finish ahead of American Victor Dyrgall.

1. Doroteo Flores (GUA) 2:31:53   6. Theodore Corbitt (NY) 2:53:31
2. Victor Dyrgall (NY) 2:36:40 7. Sevki Koru (TUR) 2:54:15
3. Luis Velasquez (GUA) 2:40:08 8. Edo Romognoli (NY) 2:57:28
4. Thomas Jones (PA) 2:43:29 9. Louis White (NY) 2:58:24
5. Norman Tamamaha (HI) 2:51:55 10. Arnold Briggs (NY) 2:58:46

57th Boston Marathon – Monday, April 20, 1953

Once again, the course record fell – this time to the lightest champion in race history. Japan’s Keizo Yamada, who weighed just 108 pounds and stood only 5 feet, 2 inches, shed the leaders on Heartbreak Hill and finished 28 seconds ahead of Finland’s Veikko Karvonen. Sweden’s Karl Gosta Leandersson, the 1949 winner, provided a record-setting pace for the first 19 miles with Karvonen and Yamada giving chase. The race marked the emergence of John J. Kelley, a Boston University trackster, who secretly wore the B.A.A. unicorn and colors. The "Younger" Kelley (no relation to John A. “The Elder” Kelley) finished fifth in 2:28:19.

1. Keizo Yamada (JPN) 2:18:51   6. Hideo Hamamura (JPN) 2:32:30
2. Veikko Karvonen (FIN) 2:19:19† 7. John A. Kelley (MA) 2:32:46
3. Karl Gosta Leandersson (SWE) 2:19:36 8. Kurau Hiroshima (JPN) 2:33:33
4. Katsua Nishida (JPN) 2:21:35 9. John Lafferty (MA) 2:38:04
5. John J. Kelley (CT) 2:28:19 10. Norman Tamamaha (HI) 2:38:38

58th Boston Marathon – Monday, April 19, 1954

Runner-up the previous year, Finland’s Veikko Karvonen upset a stellar field that included world record-holder James H. Peters of England, Japanese champion Kurau Hiroshima, Finnish champion Erkki Puolakka, and American AAU champion John J. Kelley. Peters forged a strong pace during the middle third of the race with Karvonen closely following. As Peters’ effort was hampered by severe leg cramps inWest Newton, Karvonen carried the lead over the final miles to win by just over two minutes in 2:20:39. Olympic champion Delfo Cabreara-Gomez of Argentina finished sixth.

1. Veikko Karvonen (FIN) 2:20:39   6. Delfo Cabreara-Gomez (ARG) 2:27:50
2. James H. Peters (GBR) 2:22:40 7. John J. Kelley (CT) 2:28:51
3. Erkki Puolakka (FIN) 2:24:25 8. Ezequiel Busamante (ARG) 2:33:40
4. Kurau Hiroshima (JPN) 2:25:30 9. Nicholas Costes (PA) 2:35:17
5. Katsua Nishida (JPN) 2:27:35 10. Nobuyoshi Sadanaga (JPN) 2:37:19

59th Boston Marathon – Tuesday, April 19, 1955

Hideo Hamamura, a Japanese speedster, staged a great run over the second half of the course to lower the course record once again. Hamamura came from 10th position to take the lead from American Nicholas Costes just over three miles from the finish. Hamamura finished in 2:18:22 – 29 seconds better than the old record set by countryman Keizo Yamada in 1953.

1. Hideo Hamamura (JPN)† 2:18:22   6. Gustaf Jansson (SWE) 2:21:40
2. Eino Pulkkinen (FIN) 2:19:23 7. Yoshitaka Uchikawa (JPN) 2:22:40
3. Nicholas Costes (MA) 2:19:57 8. Tadaaki Tanabe (JPN) 2:26:08
4. Paavo E. Kotila (FIN) 2:20:16 9. Ezequiel Busamante (ARG) 2:27:51
5. Reinaldo Berto Gorno (ARG) 2:20:28 10. Rodolfo Mendez, Jr. (NY) 2:28:30

60th Boston Marathon – Thursday, April 19, 1956

Finland’s Antti Viskari, a sergeant in the military, shattered the former course record by more than four minutes to finish first in 2:14:14. However, his time was just 19 seconds ahead of runner-up John J. Kelley. In fact, each of the first four runners had eclipsed the former mark, which naturally led to questions regarding the exact length of the course. Upon remeasuring, the distance was found to be 1,183 yards short. Road repairs and changes beginning in 1951 were cited as the cause of the shrinking course.

1. Antti Viskari (FIN)† 2:14:14   6. Theodore Corbitt (NY) 2:28:06
2. John J. Kelley (CT) 2:14:33 7. Gordon Dickson (NY) 2:28:45
3. Eino Oksanen (FIN) 2:17:56 8. Joe Tyler (CA) 2:29:17
4. Nicholas Costes (MA) 2:18:01 9. Robert Cons (CA) 2:29:24
5. Dean Thackwray (MA) 2:20:24 10. Fred Wilt (NY) 2:29:27

61st Boston Marathon – Saturday, April 20, 1957

John J. Kelley snapped a streak of 11 foreign wins with an accurately measured, course-record performance of 2:20:05. This was the first win by an American since the 1945 victory of John A. "The Elder" Kelley. Young Kelley disposed of a host of international competitors near 16 miles and won by almost four minutes. The last to lose contact was 1954 champion Veikko Karvonen, as Kelley became the first and only member of the host B.A.A. Running Club to win the Boston Marathon.

1. John J. Kelley (CT) 2:20:05†   6. Keizo Yamada (JPN) 2:33:22
2. Veikko Karvonen (FIN) 2:23:54 7. Gordon Dickson (CAN) 2:37:04
3. Chiang W. Lim (KOR) 2:24:59 8. Nobuyoshi Sadanaga (JPN) 2:38:13
4. Olavi Manninen (FIN) 2:25:19 9. Rodolfo Mendez, Jr. (NY) 2:39:45
5. Soong C. Han (KOR) 2:28:14 10. Alfred Confalone (MA) 2:47:51

† Course Record

62nd Boston Marathon – Saturday, April 18, 1958

A foreign runner once again found the finish line ahead of the field as Yugoslavian Franjo Mihalic, the 1956 Olympic runner-up, ran to victory in 2:25:54. Almost five minutes behind was John J. Kelley, who finished second at 2:30:51. Before his Boston Marathon career ended, Kelley finished second on five occasions. Mihalic survived the 84-degree day to become the first Eastern European to win the Boston Marathon.

1. Franjo Mihalic (YUG) 2:25:54   6. Shalom Kahalani (ISR) 2:48:00
2. John J. Kelley (CT) 2:30:51 7. Thomas C. Ryan (CA) 2:50:13
3. Einno Pulkkinen (FIN) 2:37:05 8. Gonzales Scotto (MA) 2:52:07
4. Tony Sapienza (MA) 2:39:46 9. John A. Kelley (MA) 2:52:12
5. Pedro Peralta (MEX) 2:42:35 10. Laurence H. Fauber (MA) 2:53:17

63rd Boston Marathon – Monday, April 20, 1959

The Finns continued to show their dominance in the running world as Helsinki police detective Eino Oksanen, third in the 1956 race, claimed the first of his three Boston wins in a time of 2:22:42. John J. Kelley would again finish second (2:23:43).

1. Eino Oksanen (FIN) 2:22:42   6. Robert Pape (GBR) 2:28:28
2. John J. Kelley (CT) 2:23:43 7. Nobuyoshi Sadanaga (JPN) 2:29:30
3. Gordon Dickson (CAN) 2:24:04 8. James Green (MA) 2:29:58
4. Veikko Karvonen (FIN) 2:24:37 9. Alfred Confalone (MA) 2:33:50
5. Osvaldo Suarez (ARG) 2:28:24 10. Geoffrey Watt (AUS) 2:34:37

64th Boston Marathon – Tuesday, April 19, 1960

With Eino Oksanen not returning to defend his title, Finnish countryman Paavo Kotila won this U.S. Olympic trial race in 2:20:54. Kotila left the competition 10 miles into the race for a virtual solo run to the finish. His winning time was the second-fastest ever on the measured course. New York’s Gordon McKenzie made a late rush to finish second in 2:22:18, and James Green of the host B.A.A. Running Club finished third (2:23:37).

1. Paavo Kotila (FIN) 2:20:54   6. Alexander Breckenridge (VA) 2:28:44
2. Gordon McKenzie (NY) 2:22:18 7. Robert Carman (PA) 2:29:06
3. James Green (MA) 2:23:37 8. Robert Cons (CA) 2:30:39
4. Alfred Confalone (MA) 2:26:30 9. Thomas C. Ryan (CA) 2:32:49
5. Veikko Karvonen (FIN) 2:28:30 10. Robert Drake (CA) 2:34:12

65th Boston Marathon – Wednesday, April 19, 1961

Eino Oksanen roared back after a year’s absence for his second victory in 2:23:29. Battling a chilling wind and a temperature of 39 degrees, the trio of Oksanen, John J. Kelley, and England’s Fred Norris charged into Newton Lower Falls at a quick pace. Just before the hills, a stray black dog darted onto the course and sent Kelley sprawling onto the pavement. Norris stopped to assist Kelley, who regrouped quickly and briefly caught Oksanen on the Newton hills. Oksanen’s strength proved too much for Kelley, who crossed the line 25 seconds back as runner-up for the fourth time.

1. Eino Oksanen (FIN) 2:23:29   6. George Terry (CT) 2:30:20
2. John J. Kelley (CT) 2:23:54 7. Gar Williams (IL) 2:32:22
3. Fred Norris (GBR) 2:25:46 8. Fritz Gruber (AUT) 2:32:49
4. Gordon McKenzie (NY) 2:28:40 9. James Green (MA) 2:32:58
5. Olavi Manninen (FIN) 2:29:46 10. Edward Duncan (MA) 2:33:46

66th Boston Marathon – Thursday, April 19, 1962

Eino Oksanen captured the last of his three Boston wins with a 2:23:48 performance on a cold and rain-soaked afternoon. Oksanen finished one minute, 10 seconds ahead of countryman Paavo Pystynen (2:24:58) after taking the lead from him near Boston College. John J. Kelley finished fourth, nearly five minutes behind Oksanen.

1. Eino Oksanen (FIN) 2:23:48   6. Erki Kaunitso (MA) 2:32:26
2. Paavo Pystynen (FIN) 2:24:58 7. George Terry (CT) 2:32:48
3. Alexander Breckenridge (VA) 2:27:17 8. Allen Hull, Jr. (MA) 2:33:01
4. John J. Kelley (CT) 2:28:37 9. Richard Haines (DC) 2:33:09
5. Orville Atkins (CAN) 2:31:49 10. Larry Damon (MA) 2:34:05

67th Boston Marathon – Friday, April 19, 1963

All eyes focused on the 1960 Olympic Marathon champion Abebe Bikila, of Ethiopia, who went on to win gold in 1964, and countryman Mamo Wolde, the 1968 Olympic Marathon winner. The duo forged a record-setting pace for the first 18 miles, before Bikila (fifth) and Wolde (12th) fell victim to a sudden cold east wind and the Newton hills. Belgium’s Aurele Vandendriessche saw his opening, and rushed home with a course record of 2:18:58. Again, John J. Kelley finished in the runner-up spot, while defending champion Eino Oksanen finished fourth.

1. Aurele Vandendriessche (BEL) 2:18:58†   6. Jessie Eblen (WA) 2:27:42
2. John J. Kelley (CT) 2:21:09 7. Alexander Breckenridge (VA) 2:28:28
3. Brian Kilby (GBR) 2:21:43 8. Tenho Salakka (FIN) 2:29:13
4. Eino Oksanen (FIN) 2:22:23 9. Gar Williams (IL) 2:31:19
5. Abebe Bikila (ETH) 2:24:43 10. Louis Castagnola (DC) 2:32:23

† Course Record

68th Boston Marathon – Monday, April 20, 1964

As the field exceeded 300 runners for the first time, Aurele Vandendriessche successfully defended his championship with a 2:19:59 performance. The lean Belgian attacked the Newton hills in strong fashion, eventually pulling away from the Canadians and Finns who were dictating the pace. Noted Boston Marathon writer and historian Hal Higdon was fifth.

1. Aurele Vandendriessche (BEL) 2:19:59   6. David Ellis (CAN) 2:22:49
2. Tenho Salakka (FIN) 2:20:48 7. John J. Kelley (CT) 2:27:23
3. Ronald Wallingford (CAN) 2:20:51 8. Osvaldo Suarez (ARG) 2:27:51
4. Paavo Pystynen (FIN) 2:21:33 9. Paul Hoffman (CAN) 2:28:07
5. Hal Higdon (IN) 2:21:55 10. William Allen (CAN) 2:28:19

69th Boston Marathon – Monday, April 19, 1965

It had been 10 years since a Japanese runner last won Boston. Morio Shigematsu, who lowered the course record to 2:16:33, led a daunting Japanese contingent which claimed five of the top six spots. Defending champion Aurele Vandendriessche finished fourth to prevent the clean sweep. This was the first B.A.A. marathon in more than 40 years not to finish on Exeter Street by the Lenox Hotel. Beginning this year and continuing for the next 20, the finish line would be located two blocks away on Boylston Street, in front of the Prudential Building.

1. Morio Shigematsu (JPN) 2:16:33†   6. Kazuo Matsubara (JPN) 2:19:17
2. Hideaki Shishido (JPN) 2:17:13 7. Ralph Buschmann (MA) 2:20:20
3. Takayuki Nakeo (JPN) 2:17:31 8. Eino Oksanen (FIN) 2:21:13
4. Aurele Vandendriessche (BEL) 2:17:44 9. Eino Velle (FIN) 2:21:52
5. Yoshikazu Funasako (JPN) 2:18:18 10. Erik Ostbye (SWE) 2:22:05

† Course Record

70th Boston Marathon – Tuesday, April 19, 1966

Once again the Japanese runners ran away from the field as they convincingly swept the first four places. Japanese champion and pre-race favorite Tooru Terasawa was upset by countryman Kenji Kimihara, who came from fourth in the last two miles to grab the victory wreath in 2:17:11. Although women would not be officially recognized until 1972, Roberta "Bobbi" Gibb became the first woman to run and successfully complete the race, finishing in 3:21:40.

1. Kenji Kimihara (JPN) 2:17:11   6. Dave Ellis (CAN) 2:19:47
2. Seiichiro Sasaki (JPN) 2:17:34 7. Tom Laris (NY) 2:21:44
3. Tooru Terasawa (JPN) 2:17:46 8. Bob Scharf (WA) 2:22:15
4. Hirokazu Okabe (JPN) 2:18:11 9. Ron Daws (MN) 2:24:47
5. Norman Higgins (CA) 2:18:26 10. Bong Nae Kim (KOR) 2:24:44

Unofficial Era of Women’s Participation

1. Roberta (Bobbi) Gibb (MA) 3:21:40

71st Boston Marathon – Wednesday, April 19, 1967

New Zealander David C. McKenzie led a record field of 601 starters while setting a course record of 2:15:45. Dartmouth College alumnus Tom Laris finished second with the fastest American time (2:16:48) over the Boston course to date. Bobbi Gibb was again the first woman (unofficial) in 3:27:17. The story of the day focused on Kathrine Switzer, who obtained a number by entering as "K. V. Switzer." This did not sit well with the race officials. When John (Jock) Semple attempted to remove her number mid-race, he was cut down by Switzer’s burly boyfriend. Pictures of the incident were seen around the world.

1. David C. McKenzie (NZL) 2:15:45†   6. Andrew Boychuk (CAN) 2:18:17
2. Tom Laris (NY) 2:16:48 7. Takashi Inoue (JPN) 2:20:41
3. Yutaki Aoki (JPN) 2:17:17 8. Tooru Terasawa (JPN) 2:21:17
4. Louis Castagnola (DC) 2:17:48 9. Danny McFadzean (GBR) 2:22:06
5. Antonio Ambu (ITA) 2:18:04 10. Kalevi Ihaksi (FIN) 2:22:07

Unofficial Era of Women’s Participation

1. Roberta (Bobbi) Gibb (MA) 3:27:17
2. Kathrine Switzer (NY) 4:20:02

† Course Record

72nd Boston Marathon – Friday, April 19, 1968

Wesleyan University student Ambrose "Amby" Burfoot gave American runners their first victory in 11 years as the field grew to a record 900 runners. Burfoot, coached by former winner John J. Kelley, finished in 2:22:17 in the warm 72-degree sunshine. Burfoot made his move against U.S. Marine William Clark over the final five miles to earn a 38-second victory. Roberta "Bobbi" Gibb (unofficial again) was the leading female finisher in 3:30:00. A total of three women finished the race this year. This also marked the final year the race was held on a day other than Monday. The following year, Patriots’ Day was designated to be celebrated on the third Monday in April.

1. Ambrose (Amby) Burfoot (CT) 2:22:17   6. Bob Deines (CA) 2:30:13
2. William Clark (VA) 2:22:49 7. Jose Garcia Gaspar (MEX) 2:30:29
3. Alfredo Penaloza (MEX) 2:25:06 8. Mikko Ala-Leppilampi (FIN) 2:31:35
4. Pablo Garrivo Lugo (MEX) 2:25:07 9. Danny McFadzean (GBR) 2:32:27
5. Ron Daws (MN) 2:29:17 10. August Mulreke (NY) 2:34:15

Unofficial Era of Women’s Participation

1. Roberta (Bobbi) Gibb (MA) 3:30:00
2. Kathrine Switzer (NY) 3:45:00*
3. Marjorie Fish 4:45:00*

*Approximate Time

73rd Boston Marathon – Monday, April 21, 1969

The starting field topped the 1,000 mark for the first time (1,152), which led to the introduction of qualifying standards the following year. Japan once again raced to the forefront as Yoshiaki Unetani unleashed a superlative effort, taking down Dave McKenzie’s course record by nearly two minutes in 2:13:49. Unetani ran alone over the final nine miles as Mexican runners Pablo Garrivo Lugo (2:17:24) and Alfredo Penaloza (2:19:23) finished second and third, respectively. Three women — running unofficially — finished, led by Sara Mae Berman from Cambridge, Massachusetts, in 3:22:46.

1. Yoshiaki Unetani (JPN) 2:13:49†   6. Robert Deines (CA) 2:22:46
2. Pablo Garrivo Lugo (MEX) 2:17:24 7. Jose Garcia Gaspar (MEX) 2:23:12
3. Alfredo Penaloza (MEX) 2:19:23 8. Patrick McMahon (IRL) 2:23:21
4. Ron Daws (MN) 2:20:21 9. Phil Hampton (GBR) 2:23:43
5. Robert (Bob) Moore (CAN) 2:21:25 10. Penti Rummakko (FIN) 2:24:11

Unofficial Era of Women’s Participation

1. Sara Mae Berman (MA) 3:22:46
2. Nina Kuscsik (NY) 3:46:00*
3. Elaine Pederson (CA) 3:50:00*

† Course Record
* Approximate Time

74th Boston Marathon – Monday, April 20, 1970

On a rain-soaked, 44-degree day, Englishman Ron Hill demolished Unetani’s year-old mark with a stunning 2:10:30 course record. In the process, Georgetown alumnus Eamon O’Reilly lowered the American record to 2:11:12, which was also under Unetani’s previous mark of 2:13:49. The entry qualifying time of four hours (or the equivalent at shorter distances) only succeeded in reducing the field to 1,011 starters. Sara Mae Berman was again the first woman in 3:05:07.

1. Ron Hill (GBR) 2:10:30†   6. Kenneth Moore (OR) 2:19:47
2. Eamon O’Reilly (DC) 2:11:12* 7. Robert (Bob) Moore (CAN) 2:20:07
3. Patrick McMahon (IRL) 2:14:53 8. Andrew Boychuk (CAN) 2:21:06
4. Penti Rummakko (FIN) 2:14:59 9. William Clark (PA) 2:22:17
5. Kalle Harkkaraainen (FIN) 2:19:42 10. Wayne Yetman (CAN) 2:22:32

Unofficial Era of Women’s Participation

1. Sara Mae Berman (MA) 3:05:07
2. Nina Kuscsik (NY) 3:12:16
3. Sandra Zerrangi 3:30:00*
4. Diane Fournier (ME) 3:32:00*
5. Kathrine Switzer (NY) 3:34:00*

† Course Record
* American Record

75th Boston Marathon – Monday, April 19, 1971

The field dipped to 887 starters this year as the B.A.A. raised the qualifying standard to three hours, 10 minutes. The race turned out to be one of the closest finishes ever as Colombian Alvaro Mejia and Patrick McMahon, a Massachusetts resident and Ireland native, dueled almost the entire way before Mejia pulled away within 150 yards from the finish. Mejia was clocked in at 2:18:45, just five seconds ahead of McMahon. Sara Mae Berman, who finished in 3:08:30, again led the unofficial women’s entrants.

1. Alvaro Mejia (COL) 2:18:45   6. Arthur Coolidge (MA) 2:23:23
2. Patrick McMahon (IRL) 2:18:50 7. William Speck (RI) 2:23:54
3. John Halberstadt (RSA) 2:22:23 8. Markku Salminen (FIN) 2:24:02
4. John Vitale (CT) 2:22:45 9. Ron Wallingford (CAN) 2:25:21
5. Byron J. Lowry (CA) 2:23:20 10. William Clark (CA) 2:26:19

Unofficial Era of Women’s Participation

1. Sara Mae Berman (MA) 3:08:30
2. Nina Kuscsik (NY) 3:09:00*
Kathrine Switzer (NY) 3:28:00*

*Approximate Time

76th Boston Marathon – Monday, April 17, 1972*

Olavi Suomalainen, a 25-year-old student, became the first Finnish winner at Boston in 10 years. Suomalainen broke away from Colombia’s Victor Manuel Mora near Boston College to finish first in 2:15:29. The women received official recognition this year, and New Yorker Nina Kuscsik became the first official women’s winner at Boston with a 3:10:26 performance. The qualifying standards began to take hold and became the mark toward which the marathon populace would aspire, leading to increased participation in the event.

Men

1. Olavi Suomalainen (FIN) 2:15:39   6. Bruce Mortenson (NY) 2:19:59
2. Victor Manuel Mora (COL) 2:15:57 7. Jeff Galloway (FL) 2:20:03
3. Jacinto Sabinal (MEX) 2:16:10 8. Alvaro Mejia (COL) 2:20:06
4. Alfredo Penaloza (MEX) 2:18:46 9. Steve Dean (CA) 2:20:29
5. Pablo Garrivo Lugo (MEX) 2:19:50 10. Markku Salminen (FIN) 2:20:42

Women

1. Nina Kuscsik (NY) 3:10:26†   6. Valerie Rogosheske (VA) 4:29:32
2. Elaine Pedersen (CA) 3:20:25 7. Ginny Collins (MA) 4:48:32
3. Kathrine Switzer (NY) 3:29:51 8. Frances Morrison (TX) 5:07:00
4. Pat Barrett (NJ) 3:40:29    
5. Sara Mae Berman (MA) 3:48:30    

*First Year of Official Participation for Women
† Course Record

77th Boston Marathon – Monday, April 16, 1973

Former Cornell University track standout Jon Anderson pulled away from defending champion Olavi Suomalainen near the 20-mile mark and won by one minute in 2:16:03. New Jersey’s Tom Fleming closed fast over the final miles to grab the runner-up spot from Suomalainen. This was the first of Fleming’s two second-place finishes at Boston. Jacqueline A. Hansen, of California, took the women’s title in 3:05:59.

Men

1. Jon Anderson (OR) 2:16:03   6. Dennis Spencer (GA) 2:22:31
2. Tom Fleming (NJ) 2:17:03 7. Bob Moore (CAN) 2:23:57
3. Olavi Suomalainen (FIN) 2:18:21 8. Paabo Leiviska (FIN) 2:23:57
4. Bernard Plain (GBR) 2:21:10 9. John Vitale (CT) 2:24:06
5. Jeff Galloway (FL) 2:21:27 10. Ron Daws (MN) 2:24:09

Women

1. Jacqueline A. Hansen (CA) 3:05:59†   6. Gerda Reinke (GER) 3:30:20
2. Nina Kuscsik (NY) 3:06:29 7. Sigrid Nadon (OH) 3:30:40
3. Jennifer Taylor (MA) 3:16:30 8. Merry Cushing (MA) 3:36:06
4. Kathrine Switzer (NY) 3:20:30 9. Valerie Rogosheske (MN) 3:51:12
5. Sara Mae Berman (MA) 3:30:05 10. Diane Fournier (ME) 4:13:28

78th Boston Marathon – Monday, April 15, 1974

The presence of the collegiate speedboys in the marathon was felt at Boston. Ireland’s Neil Cusack, a student at East Tennessee State University, ran away with a convincing 2:13:39 victory, the second-fastest winning time to date, while New Jersey’s Tom Fleming was second again, 46 seconds back. Michiko "Miki" Gorman, 38, from Los Angeles, led the women’s field with a record 2:47:11 performance, marking the first time a woman had run under the three-hour mark at Boston.

Men

1. Neil Cusack (IRL) 2:13:39   6. Steve Hoag (MN) 2:16:44
2. Tom Fleming (NJ) 2:14:25 7. Bob Moore (CAN) 2:16:45
3. Jerome Drayton (CAN) 2:15:40 8. Ron Wayne (OR) 2:16:58
4. Lucien Rosalka (Ceylon) 2:15:53 9. Bernie Allen (MD) 2:17:02
5. Vilho Paajanen (FIN) 2:16:15 10. Carl Hatfield (WV) 2:17:36

Women

1. Michiko (Miki) Gorman (CA) 2:47:11†   6. Lydia Ritter (GER) 3:05:18
2. Christa Kifferschlager (GER) 2:53:00 7. Renate Kieninger (GER) 3:08:45
3. Nina Kuscsik (NY) 2:55:12 8. Valerie Rogosheske (MN) 3:09:28
4. Manuela Preuss (GER) 2:58:46 9. Lucy Bunz (CA) 3:10:57
5. Kathrine Switzer (NY) 3:01:39 10. Irene Rudolph (CA) 3:12:13

† Course Record

79th Boston Marathon – Monday, April 21, 1975

Boston’s Bill Rodgers, "The People’s Choice" and the runner most responsible for popularizing the marathon boom, stunned the largest starting field to date (2,121) with a course and American record of 2:09:55. What made Rodgers’ record run even more impressive was that he stopped five times — four times for water and once to tie a shoelace. West German Liane Winter established a world-best performance for women, shattering Miki Gorman’s course record in 2:42:24. The wheelchair division can trace its roots to this year, as Bob Hall successfully completed the course in 2:58:00. Race director Will Cloney promised to add this division in future years.

Men

1. Bill Rodgers (MA) 2:09:55*†   6. James Stanley (OH) 2:14:54
2. Steve Hoag (MN) 2:11:54 7. Russell Pate (SC) 2:15:22
3. Tom Fleming (NJ) 2:12:05 8. Peter Fredriksson (SWE) 2:15:38
4. Thomas Howard (CAN) 2:13:23 9. Mario Quezas (MEX) 2:16:03
5. Ron Hill (GBR) 2:13:28 10. Andrew Boychuk (CAN) 2:16:13

Women

1. Liane Winter (GER) 2:42:24#   6. Kathryn Loper (MI) 2:59:10
2. Kathrine Switzer (NY) 2:51:37 7. Marilyn Paul (OR) 2:59:37
3. Gayle S. Barron (GA) 2:54:11 8. Joan L. Ullyot (CA) 3:02:20
4. Marilyn T. Bevans (MD) 2:55:52 9. Judy Gumbs (CA) 3:02:54
5. Merry Cushing (MA) 2:56:57 10. Janice Arenz (MN) 3:03:03

† Course Record
≠ Masters Course Record
* American Record

80th Boston Marathon – Monday, April 19, 1976

The race was almost over before it began. America’s bicentennial year provided the hottest race conditions ever at Boston. The “run for the hoses” – as the 1976 race became known – was held in 100-plus-degree temperatures and forced more than 40 percent of the 1,942 starters to exit prematurely. Jack Fultz, a 27- year-old undergraduate at Georgetown University, survived the oppressive conditions to finish first in 2:20:19. Kim Merritt from Racine, Wisconsin, led the women in 2:47:10.

Men

1. Jack Fultz (VA) 2:20:19   6. Eduardo Pacheco (PR) 2:25:11
2. Mario Cuevas (MEX) 2:21:13 7. Mike Burke (MA) 2:26:11
3. Jose DeJesus (PR) 2:22:10 8. Ron Kurle (CA) 2:26:21
4. Jack Foster (NZL) 2:22:30≠ 9. Donald Slusser (PA) 2:26:38
5. James Berka (MN) 2:24:32 10. David Fiskin (NZL) 2:26:43

Women

1. Kim Merritt (WI) 2:47:10   6. Marilyn T. Bevans (MD 3:01:22
2. Michiko (Miki) Gorman (CA) 2:52:27≠ 7. Claire Spawei (NTH) 3:04:46
3. Dorothy Doolittle (TX) 2:56:26 8. Harue Yamamoto (JPN) 3:05:36
4. Gayle S. Barron (GA) 2:58:23 9. Lisa Lorrain (GA) 3:11:01
5. Nancy Kent (PA) 3:00:53 10. Liane Winter (GER) 3:12:44

≠ Masters Course Record

81st Boston Marathon – Monday, April 18, 1977

Canadian Jerome Drayton, third in the 1974 race, hooked up early in a duel with 1975 champion Bill Rodgers. However, as the 77-degree heat began to take its toll on Rodgers, Drayton pulled away past Wellesley Hills and went on to defeat a record field of 2,766 starters in 2:14:46. This was Drayton’s fifth Boston attempt and he became the first Canadian to win Boston since the 1948 triumph of Gerard A. Cote. Miki Gorman led the women once again with her finish of 2:48:33.

Men

1. Jerome Drayton (CAN) 2:14:46   6. Tom Fleming (NJ) 2:18:46
2. Veli Bally (TUR) 2:15:44 7. Gary Tuttle (CA) 2:19:42
3. Brian Maxwell (CA) 2:17:21 8. Chris Berka (CA) 2:19:48
4. Ronald Wayne (CA) 2:18:18 9. Jack Fultz (PA) 2:20:44
5. Vinnie Fleming (MA) 2:18:37 10. Russell Pate (SC) 2:21:16

Women

1. Michiko (Miki) Gorman (CA) 2:48:33   6. Lisa Matovcik (PA) 2:58:54
2. Marilyn T. Bevans (MD) 2:51:12 7. Joan L. Ullyot (CA) 3:01:04
3. Lisa Lorrain (GA) 2:56:04 8. Penny DeMoss (CA) 3:01:16
4. Gayle Olinek (CAN) 2:56:55 9. Jennifer White (VA) 3:03:33
5. Ann Forshee (MI) 2:58:54 10. Sally Sullivan (CT) 3:03:46

≠ Masters Course Record

82nd Boston Marathon – Monday, April 17, 1978

Bill Rodgers was back in fine form, but he had to hold off a fast-closing Jeff Wells to win by two seconds. Rodgers finished in 2:10:13, withWells at 2:10:15, in the race’s closest finish to date. Television sportscaster Gayle S. Barron led the women’s field in 2:44:52. The race was the fastest mass finish at Boston (and perhaps anywhere) as 2,076 runners broke the three-hour barrier, a mark that would be shattered the following year.

Men

1. Bill Rodgers (30, MA) 2:10:13   6. Kevin Ryan (30, NZL) 2:11:43
2. Jeff Wells (23, TX) 2:10:15 7. Don Kardong (29, WA) 2:14:07
3. Esa Tikkanen (23, FIN) 2:11:15 8. John Lodwick (24, TX) 2:14:12
4. Jack Fultz (28, MA) 2:11:17 9. Yutaka Taketomi (24, JPN). 2:14:34
5. John (Randy) Thomas (24, MA) 2:11:25 10. Tom Fleming (26, NJ) 2:14:44

Women

1. Gayle S. Barron (30, GA) 2:44:52   6. Kiyoko Obata (25, JPN) 2:52:34
2. Penny DeMoss (28, CA) 2:45:36 7. Ellie DeMendonca (33, MA) 2:52:49
3. Jane Killon (29, NY) 2:47:33 8. Linda Susan Donkelaar (24, AZ) 2:52:58
4. Kim Merritt (22, WI) 2:47:52 9. Nancy Linday (29, NY) 2:53:07
5. Laurie Pedrinan (34, NY) 2:48:42 10. Gayle Olinek (25, CAN) 2:53:20

83rd Boston Marathon – Monday, April 16, 1979

Bill Rodgers established a course and American best of 2:09:27 – the fourth-fastest time in the history of the sport – to collect his third triumph. Rodgers ran away from Japan’s Toshihiko Seko on Heartbreak Hill. Robert Hodge, a Greater Boston Track Club teammate of Rodgers, finished third in 2:12:30 as the GBTC placed four runners in the top 10 (Randy Thomas and Richard Mahoney were the others). Bowdoin College student Joan Benoit led the women’s field with a surprising American women’s record performance of 2:35:15. A record 7,927 runners entered the race, including 3,031 who broke 3:00:00; 282 who broke 2:30:00; and 51 who broke 2:20:00.


Men

1. Bill Rodgers (30, MA) 2:09:27*†   6. Kevin Ryan (31, NZL) 2:13:57
2. Toshihiko Seko (22, JPN) 2:10:12 7. Bobby Doyle (28, RI) 2:14:04
3. Robert Hodge (23, MA) 2:12:30 8. Randy Thomas (25, MA) 2:14:12
4. Tom Fleming (27, NJ) 2:12:56 9. Herman Atkins (31, WA) 2:14:17
5. Gary Bjorklund (27, MN) 2:13:14 10. Richard Mahoney (29, MA) 2:14:36

Women

1. Joan Benoit (21, ME) 2:35:15*†   6. Kim Merritt (23, WI) 2:44:28
2. Patti M. Lyons (28, MA) 2:38:22 7. Cynthia A. Dalrymple (37, WA) 2:45:30
3. Susan C. Krenn (29, CA) 2:38:50 8. Karen S. Doppes (23, OH) 2:45:45
4. Elizabeth A. Hassell (35, AUS) 2:39:48 9. Gayle Olinek (26, CAN) 2:47:30
5. Sue J. Petersen (34, CA) 2:43:02 10. Lauri McBride (26, NY) 2:47:37

† Course Record * American Record

84th Boston Marathon – Monday, April 21, 1980

Bill Rodgers made it three straight, but he had to contend with an arch-nemesis – soaring temperatures that reached into the high 70s. His time of 2:12:11 was more than a minute ahead of Italy’s Marco Marchei (2:13:20)yes . The apparent women’s winner, Canadian Jacqueline Gareau, crossed the line in 2:34:28, only to find another woman on the victory podium. It was later revealed that Rosie Ruiz had entered the race just after Kenmore Square, and Gareau was rightfully awarded the title seven days later.

Men

1. Bill Rodgers (32, MA) 2:12:11   6. Benji Durden (28, GA) 2:17:46
2. Marco Marchei (25, ITA) 2:13:20 7. Jamie White (22, CA) 2:17:58
3. Ron Tabb (25, TX) 2:14:48 8. Stephen Floto (27, CO) 2:18:19
4. Michael Koussis (30, GRE) 2:16:03 9. Kevin Ryan (32, NZL) 2:18:49
5. Paul Friedman (30, NJ) 2:16:46 10. Mike Pinocci (25, CA) 2:18:52

Women

1. Jacqueline Gareau (27, CAN) 2:34:28†   6. Ellison Goodall (25, MA) 2:42:23
2. Patti M. Lyons (29, MA) 2:35:08 7. Toni Bernhard (33, TX) 2:44:40
3. Gillian Adams (24, GBR) 2:39:17 8. Debbie Eide (24, OR) 2:45:36
4. Laurie Binder (32, CA) 2:39:22 9. Elaine Campo (29, CA) 2:46:44
5. Kathleen Samet (31, NM) 2:41:50 10. Kiki Sweigart (28, CT) 2:46:47

† Course Record

85th Boston Marathon – Monday, April 20, 1981

Japan’s Toshihiko Seko, the 1979 runner-up, set a course record of 2:09:26 to beat Americans Craig Virgin and Bill Rodgers. Seko eclipsed Rodgers’ 1979 mark by a single second. He made his move at the back of Heartbreak Hill, passed Rodgers, and focused on Virgin. He overtook the former University of Illinois All- American with less than five miles to go, and Seko finished exactly one minute ahead of Virgin. New Zealander Allison Roe ran away from Patti Catalano with a course record time of 2:26:46. Catalano, the former Patti Lyons, finished second for the third straight year, but did set an American record of 2:27:51.

Men

1. Toshihiko Seko (24, JPN) 2:09:26†   6. Jukke Toivola (28, FIN) 2:11:52
2. Craig Virgin (25, IL) 2:10:26 7. Dennis Rinde (22, CA) 2:12:01
3. Bill Rodgers (33, MA) 2:10:34 8. David Chettle (29, GBR) 2:12:23
4. John Lodwick (27, TX) 2:11:33 9. Kyle Heffner (25, CO) 2:12:31
5. Malcolm East (25, PA) 2:11:35 10. Victor Mora-Garcia (36, COL) 2:12:55

Women

1. Allison Roe (24, NZL) 2:26:46†   6. Sissel Grottenberg (24, NOR) 2:33:02
2. Patti (Lyons) Catalano (30, MA) 2:27:51* 7. Nancy Conz (23, MA) 2:34:48
3. Joan Benoit (23, ME) 2:30:16 8. Laura Dewald (23, VA) 2:35:57
4. Julie Shea (23, NC) 2:30:54 9. Kiki Sweigart (29, CT) 2:36:55
5. Jacqueline Gareau (28, CAN) 2:31:26 10. Lorrie Dierdorff (23, CA) 2:38:03

† Course Record
* American Record

86th Boston Marathon – Monday, April 19, 1982

One of the most memorable duels in the history of Boston was waged on a sun-scorched afternoon in 1982.Wayland resident Alberto Salazar and Minnesota dairy farmer Dick Beardsley fought one another over the nine-mile stretch from the Newton hills to the finish. Beardsley did the front-running with Salazar tucked in behind, during their record pace. With less than one mile remaining, Salazar moved to the front. A sprint finish ensued, and Salazar emerged victorious in 2:08:52, with Beardsley just two seconds back (2:08:54), marking the first time two runners had broken 2:09:00 in the same race. West German Charlotte Teske easily won the women’s race by nearly seven minutes ahead of Canada’s Jacqueline Gareau.

Men

1. Alberto Salazar (23, MA) 2:08:52†   6. Dennis Rinde (23, CA) 2:15:04
2. Dick Beardsley (24, MN) 2:08:54 7. Terry Baker (26, MD) 2:16:32
3. John Lodwick (28, TX) 2:12:01 8. Rick Callison (27, OH) 2:16:35
4. Bill Rodgers (34, MA) 2:12:38 9. Robert Wallace (30, NE) 2:17:18
5. Kjell-Erik Stahl (35, SWE) 2:12:46 10. Ben Morturi (26, TX) 2:17:30

Women

1. Charlotte Teske (32, GER) 2:29:33   6. Kathy Molitor (28, TX) 2:41:12
2. Jacqueline Gareau (29, CAN) 2:36:09 7. Julie Isphording (20, OH) 2:43:31
3. Eileen G. Claugus (27, CA) 2:38:48 8. Zehava Shmoeli (27, ISR) 2:44:00
4. Kiki Sweigart (30, CT) 2:39:49 9. Shirley Finken (24, NJ) 2:44:09
5. Shirley Kay Durtschi (30, OR) 2:40:47 10. Nancy Mieszczak (33, NY) 2:44:17

† Course Record

87th Boston Marathon – Monday, April 18, 1983

Michigan native Greg A. Meyer ran a tactically sound race to win in 2:09:00, the third-fastest time ever at Boston. Meyer followed the lead of Georgia’s Benji Durden and, after a brief surge in the Newton hills, ran the remaining miles alone. Ron Tabb of Oregon closed fast over the final miles to grab the runner-up spot. As great as Meyer’s race was, there was an even better one on this day. Joan Benoit shattered the women’s world-best with a stunning time of 2:22:43. Benoit set out at a mind-boggling 2:17 pace, attacking the course and every checkpoint record possible along the way with stern determination. Benoit finished more than two minutes faster than the old world mark.

Men

1. Greg A. Meyer (27, MA) 2:09:00   6. David Edge (28, CAN) 2:11:03
2. Ron Tabb (28, OR) 2:09:31 7. Michael Layman (28, WA) 2:11:24
3. Benji Durden (31, GA) 2:09:57 8. Dan Schlessinger (28, MA) 2:11:36
4. Edward Mendoza (30, AZ) 2:10:06 9. Jeff Wells (29, OR) 2:11:42
5. Chris Bunyan (24, IL) 2:10:54 10. Bill Rodgers (35, MA) 2:11:58

Women

1. Joan Benoit (25, MA) 2:22:43#   6. Jane Wipf (25, UT) 2:37:18
2. Jacqueline Gareau (30, CAN) 2:29:27 7. Kare Cassaboon-Holm (27, NY) 2:37:40
3. Mary Shea (22, NC) 2:33:23 8. Mindy Ireland (31, CA) 2:39:07
4. Karen E. Dunn (20, NH) 2:33:35 9. Maria Trujillo (23, AZ) 2:39:45
5. Sue King (24, AL) 2:33:52 10. Kim Burns (23, AR) 2:42:10

# World Record

88th Boston Marathon – Monday, April 16, 1984

England’s Geoff Smith used the Boston race as a qualifier for his selection to the British Olympic Marathon team. Most of the top Americans bypassed the race in favor of their own Olympic trials and Smith ran alone to finish in 2:10:34. Smith’s performance earned him a spot on the British team and the women’s winner, Lorraine Moller of New Zealand, also qualified for her Olympic team. Moller and countrywoman Allison Roe controlled most of the early front-running, but a sore hamstring forced Roe to drop out. Moller’s performance was the fifth-fastest at Boston.

Men

1. Geoff Smith (30, GBR) 2:10:34   6. Martti Kiiholma (34, CA) 2:16:56
2. Gerry Vanesse (26, CT) 2:14:49 7. David Olds (22, MI) 2:17:05
3. Domingo Tibaduiza (30, COL) 2:15:40 8. Jairo Correa (30, COL) 2:17:12
4. Juan Zetina (27, TX) 2:15:41 9. Paul Ballinger (28, NZL) 2:17:39
5. Keld Johansen (28, DEN) 2:16:36 10. Donald Freedline (28, PA) 2:17:46

Women

1. Lorraine Moller (25, NZL) 2:29:28   6. Gabriele Andersen (39, ID) 2:39:28
2. Midde Hamrin (26, TX) 2:33:53 7. Lone Dybdal (25, DEN) 2:43:12
3. Sissel Grottenberg (27, NOR) 2:36:07 8. Barbara Moore (30, NZL) 2:43:47
4. Anne Hird (24, RI) 2:37:11 9. Sandra Mewett (34, BER) 2:44:07
5. Tuija Tolvonen (25, FIN) 2:37:43 10. Lena Holmann (32, PA) 2:45:33

89th Boston Marathon – Monday, April 15, 1985

Geoff Smith became the first champion to successfully defend his title since Bill Rodgers (1978–1980) as he scorched the first half of the race in 1:02:51. However, leg cramps at 19 miles forced him to a walk, and he finished in 2:14:05. Lisa Larsen-Weidenbach, the 1984 U.S. women’s Olympic Marathon alternate, ran uncontested to win Boston in her first attempt. This marked the final race to end at the Prudential Center Plaza. Beginning in 1986, the finish was moved to its current location near Copley Square Park.

Men

1. Geoff Smith (31, GBR) 2:14:05   6. Toru Mimura (22, JPN) 2:23:35
2. Gary Tuttle (37, CA) 2:19:11 7. Charles Hewes (29, NH) 2:23:35
3. Mark Helgeston (27, OH) 2:21:15 8. Daniel Dillon (27, MA) 2:23:50
4. Lou Supino (30, CO) 2:21:29 9. Christopher Fletcher (27, FL) 2:24:29
5. Bobby Doyle (36, MA) 2:21:31 10. Norman Blair (27, NC) 2:25:23

Women

1. Lisa Larsen-Weidenbach (23, MI) 2:34:06   6. Kathleen P. Northrop (34, NH) 2:46:43
2. Lynne Huntington (34, GBR) 2:42:15 7. Kimberly A. Moody 2:46:51
3. Karen E. Dunn (22, NH) 2:42:27 8. Mary P. Hynes (30, MA) 2:48:57
4. Deborah L. Butterfield (33, BER) 2:43:47 9. Elizabeth M. Bulman (25, MO) 2:50:16
5. Vickie C. Smith (29, TX) 2:46:33 10. Beth Dillinger (29, VA) 2:50:36

 

90th Boston Marathon – Monday, April 21, 1986

With the backing of Boston-based John Hancock Financial Services, the Boston Marathon awarded prize money for the first time. Consequently, the race attracted many of the top marathoners in the world. Australia’s Robert de Castella posted the third-fastest marathon ever run, setting a record of 2:07:51. He earned $30,000 for the win, $25,000 for a course record, and a new car. Norway’s Ingrid Kristiansen, the women’s world-record holder (2:21:06), won her first Boston Marathon in 2:24:55. Kristiansen also won a new car, and $35,000 in prize and bonus money.

Men

1. Robert de Castella (29, AUS) 2:07:51†   6. Robert Hodge (30, MA) 2:14:50
2. Art Boileau (28, CAN) 2:11:15 7. Domingo Tibaduiza (30, COL) 2:15:22
3. Orlando Pizzolato (26, ITA) 2:11:43 8. Paul Cummings (32, UT) 2:16:05
4. Bill Rodgers (38, MA) 2:13:36 9. Dan Schlessinger (31, MA) 2:16:29
5. Arturo Barrios (25, MEX) 2:14:09 10. Kunimitsu Ito (31, JPN) 2:17:02

Women

1. Ingrid Kristiansen (30, NOR) 2:24:55   6. Julie Isphording (24, OH) 2:33:40
2. Carla Beurskens (34, NED) 2:27:35 7. Christa Vahlensieck (36, GER) 2:34:50
3. Lizanne Bussieres (28, CAN) 2:32:16 8. Lorraine Moller (30, NZL) 2:35:06
4. Evy Palm (44, SWE) 2:32:47≠ 9. Eileen G. Claugus (31, CA) 2:38:23
5. Sinikka Keskitalo (35, FIN) 2:33:18 10. Ellen Rochefort (31, CAN) 2:40:00

† Course Record
≠Masters Course Record

91st Boston Marathon – Monday, April 20, 1987

Toshihiko Seko employed a tactical approach that resulted in a winning time of 2:11:50 on a humid and windy day. Seko ran conservatively in a large pack that numbered as many as 19. Just after reaching 21 miles, Seko bolted downhill on Commonwealth Avenue en route to his second Boston win. Finishing second and third were Steve Jones (2:12:37) of Wales, and Geoff Smith (2:12:42) of England. The women’s winner was Portugal’s Rosa Mota, whose time of 2:25:21 was the third-fastest at the Boston Marathon.

Men

1. Toshihiko Seko (30, JPN) 2:11:50   6. Robert de Castella (30, AUS) 2:14:24
2. Steve Jones (31, WAL) 2:12:37 7. Dirk Vanderherten (29, BEL) 2:15:02
3. Geoff Smith (33, GBR) 2:12:42 8. Eddy Hellebuyck (26, BEL) 2:15:16
4. Dave Gordon (27, OR) 2:13:30 9. Hideki Kita (34, JPN) 2:15:23
5. Tomoyuki Taniguchi (29, JPN) 2:13:40 10. Ken A. Martin (28, AZ) 2:15:41

Women

1. Rosa Mota (28, POR) 2:25:21   6. Evy Palm (45, SWE) 2:36:24
2. Agnes Pardaens (30, BEL) 2:29:50 7. Ellen Rochefort (32, CAN) 2:36:42
3. Ria Van Landeghem (29, BEL) 2:29:56 8. Leatrice A. Hayer (31, MA) 2:37:58
4. Odette LaPierre (32, CAN) 2:31:33 9. Jacqueline Gareau (34, CAN) 2:40:40
5. Sinikka Keskitalo (32, FIN) 2:33:58 10. Lisa Larsen-Weidenbach (25, MI) 2:43:06

92nd Boston Marathon – Monday, April 18, 1988

Twenty-eight years after the Olympic Marathon victory of the late Ethiopian Abebe Bikila, the African running revolution finally left its imprint on the historic Boston Marathon. With Boston designated as the Olympic Marathon trial by nine African countries, nearly 40 runners from the continent contributed to one of the best fields in race history. Kenya’s Ibrahim Hussein broke away from Tanzania’s Juma Ikangaa with less than 100 meters remaining for a one-second margin of victory (2:08:43). Rosa Mota of Portugal became the first woman of the official era to successfully defend her title (2:24:30).

Men

1. Ibrahim Hussein (29, KEN) 2:08:43   6. John Campbell (39, NZL) 2:11:08
2. Juma Ikangaa (28, TAN) 2:08:44 7. Orlando Pizzolato (28, ITA) 2:12:32
3. John Treacy (30, IRL) 2:09:15 8. John Makanya (24, TAN) 2:14:04
4. Gelindo Bordin (29, ITA) 2:09:27 9. Steve Jones (32, WAL) 2:14:07
5. Gianni Poli (26, ITA) 2:09:33 10. Tomoyuki Taniguchi (26, JPN) 2:14:18

Women

1. Rosa Mota (29, POR) 2:24:30   6. Ellen Rochefort (33, CAN) 2:31:36
2. Tuija Jousimaa (29, FIN) 2:29:26 7. Sinikka Keskitalo (37, FIN) 2:34:12
3. Odette LaPierre (33, CAN) 2:30:35 8. Sirkku Kumpulainen (21, FIN) 2:35:24
4. Priscilla Welch (43, GBR) 2:30:48 9. Susan Stone (27, CAN) 2:38:48
5. Lizanne Bussieres (30, CAN) 2:30:56 10. Gillian Beschloss (29, NY) 2:40:08

93rd Boston Marathon – Monday, April 17, 1989

Led by first-time winner Abebe Mekonnen of Ethiopia (2:09:06) and followed by Juma Ikangaa of Tanzania, African runners claimed three of the top four places at the 93rd B.A.A. Boston Marathon. Ireland’s John Treacy, who placed third in 2:10:24, halted an African sweep of the top four. Norway’s Ingrid Kristiansen won the women’s division (2:24:33). John Campbell of New Zealand set a Boston masters record with his fifth-place overall finish (2:14:19), while Priscilla Welch defended her masters title in a time of 2:35:00 to finish seventh overall.

Men

1. Abebe Mekonnen (25, ETH) 2:09:06   6. Simon Robert Naali (23, TAN) 2:14:59
2. Juma Ikangaa (29, TAN) 2:09:56 7. Gerardo Alcala (27, MEX) 2:15:51
3. John Treacy (31, IRL) 2:10:24 8. Kunimitsu Itoh (34, JPN) 2:16:19
4. Ibrahim Hussein (30, KEN) 2:12:41 9. Chala Wuresa (30, ETH) 2:16:19
5. John Campbell (40, NZL) 2:14:19 10. Herb Wills (28, FL) 2:17:40

Women

1. Ingrid Kristiansen (33, NOR) 2:24:33   6. Lisa Welch-Brady (26, MA) 2:34:16
2. Marguerite Buist (26, NZL) 2:29:04 7. Priscilla Welch (44, GBR) 2:35:00
3. Kim Jones (30, WA) 2:29:34 8. Odette LaPierre (34, CAN) 2:35:51
4. Eriko Asai (29, JPN) 2:33:04 9. Joan Benoit Samuelson (31, ME) 2:37:52
5. Lisa Weidenbach (27, WA) 2:33:18 10. Laurie Binder (41, CA) 2:40:25

94th Boston Marathon – Monday, April 16, 1990

With the largest group of runners ever entered (9,412), the 94th running of the Boston Marathon boasted one of the most competitive fields in the history of the race. Gelindo Bordin of Italy became the first Olympic gold medalist to win the men’s race (2:08:19); Olympic champion Rosa Mota of Portugal became the first official three-time women’s champion (2:25:24); John Campbell of New Zealand returned for a second consecutive win in the masters division, setting a course and world mark (2:11:04). In her Boston debut, Uta Pippig was runner-up.

Men

1. Gelindo Bordin (31, ITA) 2:08:19   6. Isidrio Rico (29, MEX) 2:13:02
2. Juma Ikangaa (30, TAN) 2:09:52 7. Geoff Smith (36, GBR) 2:13:38
3. Rolando Vera (24, ECU) 2:10:46 8. Salah Ooqaiche (22, MAR) 2:13:53
4. John Campbell (41, NZL) 2:11:04+ 9. Futoshi Shinohara (28, JPN) 2:14:10
5. Robert de Castella (33, AUS) 2:11:28 10. Philip O’Brien (32, GBR) 2:14:21

Women

1. Rosa Mota (31, POR) 2:25:24   6. Veronique Marot (34, GBR) 2:31:09
2. Uta Pippig (24, GER) 2:28:03 7. Zoya Ivanova (38, URS) 2:31:15
3. Maria Trujillo (30, AZ) 2:28:53 8. Ritva Lemettinen (29, FIN) 2:38:44
4. Kamila Gradus (23, POL) 2:28:56 9. Dimitra Papaspirou (26, GRE) 2:38:45
5. Kim Jones (31, WA) 2:31:01 10. Anne Roden (43, GBR) 2:39:36

+ Masters World Record

95th Boston Marathon – Monday, April 15, 1991

Ibrahim Hussein of Kenya won his second Boston title in four years (2:11:06) and Wanda Panfil of Poland became the world’s No. 1-ranked female with her first and only Boston win (2:24:18) while three other former or future women’s champions finished in the Top 10. Ken Judson of Pennsylvania (2:18:11) and Graziella Striuli of Italy (2:37:01) were the masters division champions.

Men

1. Ibrahim Hussein (32, KEN) 2:11:06   6. Douglas Wakiihuri (27, KEN) 2:13:30
2. Abebe Mekonnen (27, ETH) 2:11:22 7. Tesfaye Tafa (28, ETH) 2:14:07
3. Andy Ronan (27, IRL) 2:11:27 8. Atsushi Sakauchi (26, JPN) 2:14:18
4. Alejandro Cruz (23, MEX) 2:12:11 9. Leme Chengere (18, ETH) 2:14:28
5. Carlos Grisales (24, COL) 2:12:33 10. Andrzej Witczak (32, POL) 2:14:49

Women

1. Wanda Panfil (32, POL) 2:24:18   6. Ingrid Kristiansen (35, NOR) 2:29:51
2. Kim Jones (32, WA) 2:26:40 7. Conceicano M. Ferreira (29, POR) 2:30:18
3. Uta Pippig (25, GER) 2:26:52 8. Malgorzata Birbach (30, POL) 2:32:13
4. Joan Benoit Samuelson (33, ME) 2:26:54 9. Odette LaPierre (36, CAN) 2:32:55
5. Kamila Gradus (24, POL) 2:26:55 10. Manuela Machado (26, POR) 2:33:08

96th Boston Marathon – Monday, April 20, 1992

Ibrahim Hussein won for the third time as he broke away from the lead pack at Heartbreak Hill. His time was then the second-fastest at Boston (2:08:14), and caused him to break down in tears on the awards platform. Only 23 years old, the Russian-born Olga Markova passed pre-race favorite and defending champion Wanda Panfil of Poland en route to a winning time of 2:23:43.

Men

1. Ibrahim Hussein (33, KEN) 2:08:14   6. Boniface Merande (30, KEN) 2:12:23
2. Joaquim Pinheiro (31, POR) 2:10:39 7. Jose Santana (28, BRA) 2:12:25
3. Andreas Espinosa (29, MEX) 2:10:44 8. Abebe Mekonnen (28, ETH) 2:13:09
4. Juma Ikangaa (32, TAN) 2:11:44 9. Inocencio Miranda (30, MEX) 2:13:14
5. Joselido Rocha (27, BRA) 2:11:53 10. Tesfaye Tafa (29, ETH) 2:13:36

Women

1. Olga Markova (23, CIS) 2:23:43   6. Wanda Panfil (33, POL) 2:29:29
2. Yoshiko Yamamoto (21, JPN) 2:26:26 7. Irina Bogacheva (29, CIS) 2:32:45
3. Uta Pippig (26, GER) 2:27:12 8. Odette LaPierre (37, CAN) 2:34:19
4. Manuela Machado (27, POR) 2:27:42 9. Ritva Lemettinen (31, FIN) 2:34:30
5. Malgorzata Birbach (31, POL) 2:28:11 10. Jane Welzel (36, CO) 2:36:21

97th Boston Marathon – Monday, April 19, 1993

A late surge by Cosmas Ndeti of Kenya enabled him to win in a time of 2:09:33 – the fifth African winner in six years. A relative unknown, Ndeti ran the second half of the race faster than the first half, becoming the second champion to ever negative-split the course to date (the first was Toshihiko Seko, in 1987). Olga Markova of Russia returned to Boston, where she repeated as champion in 2:25:27. Jean-Michel Charbonnel of France and Bernardine Portenski from New Zealand captured the men’s and women’s masters divisions, respectively.

Men

1. Cosmas Ndeti (23, KEN) 2:09:33   6. Mark Plaatjes (31, CO) 2:12:39
2. Kim Jae-Ryong (26, KOR) 2:09:43 7. Boniface Merande (31, KEN) 2:12:50
3. Lucketz Swartbooi (27, NAM) 2:09:57 8. Severino Bernadini (27, ITA) 2:12:56
4. Hiromi Taniguchi (33, JPN) 2:11:02 9. Keith Brantly (30, FL) 2:12:58
5. Sammy Lelei (28, KEN) 2:12:12 10. Carlos Tarazona (27, VEN) 2:13:37

Women

1. Olga Markova (23, CIS) 2:25:27   6. Joan Benoit Samuelson (35, ME) 2:35:43
2. Kim Jones (34, WA) 2:30:00 7. Nadia Prasad (25, FRA) 2:37:11
3. Carmen De Oliviera (27,BRA) 2:31:18 8. Tatiana Titova (27,RUS) 2:37:42
4. Manuela Machado (28, POR) 2:32:20 9. Joy Smith (31, TX) 2:38:35
5. Albina Galliamova (28, RUS) 2:35:12 10. Gabriella O'Rourke (26, NZL) 2:39:09

98th Boston Marathon – Monday, April 18, 1994

Ideal weather and a highly competitive field resulted in a succession of course records. Cosmas Ndeti (2:07:15) held off Andres Espinosa (2:07:19) of Mexico, as both shattered the course record of 2:07:51 set by Robert de Castella in 1986. Further defining the phenomenal times was the fact that four of the five fastest times in history were registered in this race, while Bob Kempainen, who ran the fastest time ever by an American, finished seventh in 2:08:47. Future champion Moses Tanui made his Boston debut, finishing in 10th place. The results were similar on the women’s side, where Uta Pippig (2:21:45) took almost a full minute off Joan Benoit’s 1983 record (2:22:43) to claim her first of three consecutive titles. In all, $572,500 was awarded in prize and bonus money.

Men

1. Cosmas Ndeti (24, KEN) 2:07:15†   6. Larry Boay Akonay (24, TAN) 2:08:35
2. Andres Espinosa (31, MEX) 2:07:19 7. Bob Kempainen (27, MN) 2:08:47*
3. Jackson Kipngok (21, KEN) 2:08:08 8. Lucketz Swartbooi (28, NAM) 2:09:08
4. Hwang Young-Cho (24, KOR) 2:08:09 9. Sammy Nyangincha (32, KEN) 2:09:15
5. Arturo Barrios (31, MEX) 2:08:28 10. Moses Tanui (28, KEN) 2:09:40

Women

1. Uta Pippig (28, GER) 2:21:45†   6. Monica Pont (24, ESP) 2:29:36
2. Valentina Yegorova (30, RUS) 2:23:33 7. Martha Tenorio (27, ECU) 2:30:12
3. Elana Meyer (27, RSA) 2:25:15 8. Kim Jones (35, WA) 2:31:46
4. Alena Peterkova (33, TCH) 2:25:19 9. Colleen De Reuck (30, RSA) 2:31:53
5. Carmen De Oliviera (28, BRA) 2:27:41 10. Albertina Dias (28, POR) 2:33:21

† Course Record * American Record

99th Boston Marathon – Monday, April 17, 1995

Cosmas Ndeti’s win (2:09:22) placed the Kenyan among the rarefied rankings of Americans Clarence H. DeMar (1922–24) and Bill Rodgers (1978–80) as the only three-time consecutive winners in the men’s open division. The returning champion in the women’s field, Uta Pippig of Germany, overcame a troublesome foot injury and a decided headwind to post her second title (2:25:11). Mexico’s Martin Mondragon (2:16:29) and Russia’s Irina Bondarchuk (2:43:42) captured the laurels in the masters division.

Men

1. Cosmas Ndeti (25, KEN) 2:09:22   6. Alberto Juzdado (28, ESP) 2:12:04
2. Moses Tanui (29, KEN) 2:10:22 7. Kim Jae-Ryong (28, KOR) 2:12:15
3. Luiz Dos Santos (31, BRA) 2:11:02 8. Sammy Nyangincha (33, KEN) 2:12:16
4. Lameck Aguta (23, KEN) 2:11:03 9. Gilbert Rutto (30, KEN) 2:12:25
5. Paul Yego (29, KEN) 2:11:13 10. Thabiso Moqhali (25, LSO) 2:12:56

Women

1. Uta Pippig (29, GER) 2:25:11   6. Yoshiko Yamamoto (24, JPN) 2:31:39
2. Elana Meyer (28, RSA) 2:26:51 7. Mari Tanigawa (32, JPN) 2:31:48
3. Madina Biktagirova (30, BLS) 2:29:00 8. Susan Mahony (29, AUS) 2:33:07
4. Franziska Moser (28, SUI) 2:29:35 9. Tegla Loroupe (23, KEN) 2:33:10
5. Yvonne Danson (34, GBR) 2:30:53 10. Martha Tenorio (28, ECU) 2:33:34

100th Boston Marathon – Monday, April 15, 1996

Although technically it was the $600,000 prize purse that made the 1996 race the richest ever, it was the
record starting field, the drama of the divisional races, and a moment in history that separated the 100th
running of the Boston Marathon from its 99 predecessors. Two-time defending women’s champion Uta
Pippig overcame severe pains and a 30-second deficit to overtake runner-up Tegla Loroupe at the 25-mile
mark to win in 2:27:12. On the men’s side, Moses Tanui, second in 1995, broke away from the lead pack
to claim the title in 2:09:15, ending Cosmas Ndeti’s bid to become the first four-time-consecutive champion.
Lorraine Moller of New Zealand, who captured the women’s open title in 1984, celebrated her Boston
debut as a masters runner by posting a winning time of 2:32:02, while Herbert Steffny of Germany employed
a late surge to secure the men’s title in 2:19:33. The starting field of 38,708 stood for more than seven years
as the largest in the history of the sport. Included among the finishers were 16 Boston champions.

Men

1. Moses Tanui (30, KEN) 2:09:15   6. Abebe Mekonnen (32, ETH) 2:10:21
2. Ezekiel Bitok (30, KEN) 2:09:26 7. Charles Tangus (22, KEN) 2:10:28
3. Cosmas Ndeti (26, KEN) 2:09:51 8. Paul Yego (28, KEN) 2:10:49
4. Lameck Aguta (24, KEN) 2:10:03 9. Carlos Grisales (29, COL) 2:11:17
5. Sammy Lelei (31, KEN) 2:10:09 10. Stephen Moneghetti (33, AUS) 2:11:17

Women

1. Uta Pippig (30, GER) 2:27:12   6. Franziska Rochat-Moser (29, SUI 2:31:33
2. Tegla Loroupe (22, KEN) 2:28:37 7. Madina Biktagirova (31, BLS) 2:31:38
3. Nobuko Fujimura (31, JPN) 2:29:24 8. Lorraine Moller (40, NZL) 2:32:02
4. Sonja Krolik (23, GER) 2:29:24 9. Alla Jiliaeva (26, RUS) 2:32:32
5. Larisa Zouzko (26, RUS) 2:31:06 10. Valentina Enaki (30, MOL) 2:33:58

101st Boston Marathon – Monday, April 21, 1997

What was billed as a rematch between three-time winner Cosmas Ndeti (1994-96) and defending champion Moses Tanui, turned into a personal coming-out party for Lameck Aguta, who stole the show and the title with a triumphant 2:10:34 in his fifth attempt. Fatuma Roba, whose triumph in 2:26:23 ended a three-year reign by Uta Pippig, became just the fourth Olympic gold medalist to win the Boston Marathon. Compatriots Dominique Chauvelier (2:19:10) and Josette Colomb-Janin 2:40:53) gave France a sweep in the masters divisions. Later that summer, Aguta was involved in a near-fatal accident from which he never fully recovered.

Men

1. Lameck Aguta (25, KEN 2:10:34   6. Gilbert Rutto (32, KEN) 2:12:30
2. Joseph Kamau (24, KEN) 2:10:46 7. Jimmy Muindi (23, KEN) 2:12:49
3. Dionicio Ceron (31, MEX) 2:10:59 8. Andre Ramos (27, BRA) 2:13:10
4. German Silva (29, MEX) 2:11:21 9. Jose Luis Molina (32, CRC) 2:13:34
5. Moses Tanui (31, KEN) 2:11:38 10. Tesfaye Bekele (26, ETH) 2:14:02

Women

1. Fatuma Roba (23, ETH) 2:26:23   6. Junko Asari (27, JPN) 2:31:12
2. Elana Meyer (30, RSA) 2:27:09 7. Alla Jiliaeva (27, RUS) 2:31:55
3. Colleen De Reuck (33, RSA) 2:28:03 8. Sonia Maccioni (31, ITA) 2:31:59
4. Uta Pippig (31, GER) 2:28:51 9. Kim Jones (38, WA) 2:32:52
5. Derartu Tulu (25, ETH) 2:30:28 10. Debbie Kilpatrick (33, OH) 2:36:04

102nd Boston Marathon – Monday, April 20, 1998

Centennial champion Moses Tanui overcame a seemingly insurmountable 11-second deficit at the 35K mark, to capture his second title and register the third-fastest time on the course. Just three seconds later, countryman Joseph Chebet crossed the line, while Gert Thys was third, marking the first time in the history of the sport that three men broke the 2:08 barrier. On the women’s side, Fatuma Roba successfully defended her title with a sizzling 2:23:21. The masters division saw Andrey Kuznetsov turn in the masters’ third-fastest time on the course (2:15:27), while Floridian Cindy Barber-Keeler (2:39:49) rounded out the list of champions.

Men

1. Moses Tanui (32, KEN) 2:07:34   6. German Silva (30, MEX) 2:08:56
2. Joseph Chebet (27, KEN) 2:07:37 7. Alejandro Gomez (31, ESP) 2:12:34
3. Gert Thys (26, RSA) 2:07:52 8. Turbo Tumo (28, ETH) 2:13:06
4. Andre Ramos (28, BRA) 2:08:26 9. Jose Ramon-Rey (30, ESP) 2:13:12
5. John Kagwe (29, KEN) 2:08:51 10. Takayuki Inubushi (25, JPN) 2:13:15

Women

1. Fatuma Roba (24, ETH) 2:23:21   6. Irina Kazakova (29, FRA) 2:30:44
2. Renata Paradowska (27, POL) 2:27:17 7. Jane Salumae (30, EST) 2:31:20
3. Anuta Catuna (29, ROU) 2:27:34 8. Hiroko Nomura (27, JPN) 2:31:58
4. Manuela Machado (34, POR) 2:29:13 9. Irina Timofeyeva (28, RUS) 2:32:32
5. Colleen De Reuck (34, RSA) 2:29:43 10. Aurica Buia (28, JPN) 2:34:17

103rd Boston Marathon – Monday, April 19, 1999

Trailing by 200 meters with 10K remaining, Joseph Chebet came roaring through the downhills of Chestnut Hill and Brookline to capture the title. The late surge halted his string of three consecutive marathon second-place finishes, which included the 1998 Boston Marathon. Chebet’s heroics overshadowed a glittering performance by Boston debutant Silvio Guerra, who, after breaking from the field in the 16th mile, appeared poised to pull off a stunning upset, before Chebet tracked him down at Cleveland Circle. The women’s race once again witnessed Fatuma Roba slowly separating herself from a talent-laden field to register her third consecutive triumph. Overall, Roba was the 24th finisher, marking the highest finish by a woman at Boston, while her time of 2:23:25 was the fourth-fastest by a woman. The masters division recognized a pair of former champions as Andrey Kuznetsov collected his second straight crown, and 1997 champion Josette Colomb-Janin enjoyed a triumphant return in 2:40:36. Chebet ended the year ranked atop the world’s marathon list.

Men

1. Joseph Chebet (28, KEN) 2:09:52   6. Peter Githuka (30, KEN) 2:14:04
2. Silvio Guerra (30, ECU) 2:10:19 7. Andrey Kuznetsov (41, RUS) 2:14:20
3. Frank Pooe (25, RSA) 2:11:36 8. Jose Luis Molina (34, CRC) 2:14:27
4. Abner Chipu (27, RSA) 2:12:46 9. Ruben Maza (31, VEN) 2:14:41
5. John Kagwe (30, KEN) 2:13:58 10. Julius Ondieki (29, KEN) 2:15:28

Women

1. Fatuma Roba (25, ETH) 2:23:25   6. Catherine Ndereba (26, KEN) 2:28:27
2. Franziska Rochat-Moser (32, SUI) 2:25:51 7. Ludmila Petrova (30, RUS) 2:29:13
3. Yuko Arimori (32, JPN) 2:26:39 8. Mitsuko Sugihara (24, JPN) 2:30:34
4. Colleen De Reuck (35, RSA) 2:27:54 9. Renata Paradowska (28, POL) 2:31:41
5. Martha Tenorio (32, ECU) 2:27:58 10. Anuta Catuna (30, ROU) 2:33:49

104th Boston Marathon – Monday, April 17, 2000

Boston Marathon 2000 proved to be one of the most compelling and entertaining all-around performances in event history. Overall champion Elijah Lagat and runner-up Gezahegne Abera were credited with an identical finishing time (2:09:47) while two-time champion Moses Tanui of Kenya finished third (2:09:50). Similar records were established in the women’s race, where Kenyan Catherine Ndereba pulled away from threetime defending champion Fatuma Roba in the final mile, becoming the first Kenyan woman to win the Boston Marathon. Joshua Kipkemboi became the first Kenyan to win the men’s masters division (2:17:11), and Gitte Karlshoj ruled the women’s division (2:35:11). While the race qualified Lagat for the Kenyan Olympic team, it was Abera who won the gold in Sydney later that year.

Men

1. Elijah Lagat (33, KEN) 2:09:47   6. John Kagwe (31, KEN) 2:12:26
2. Gezahegne Abera (21, ETH) 2:09:47 7. Laban Nkete (29, RSA) 2:12:30
3. Moses Tanui (34, KEN) 2:09:50 8. Joseph Chebet (29, KEN 2:12:39
4. Ondoro Osoro (32, KEN) 2:10:29 9. Julius Ruto (28, KEN) 2:13:26
5. David Kiptum Busienei (25, KEN) 2:11:26 10. Silvio Guerra (31, ECU) 2:14:18

Women

1. Catherine Ndereba (27, KEN) 2:26:11   6. Ai Dongmei (18, CHN) 2:30:18
2. Irina Bogacheva (38, KGZ) 2:26:27 7. Ornella Ferrara (32, ITA) 2:30:20
3. Fatuma Roba (26, ETH) 2:26:27 8. Sun Yingjie (21, CHN) 2:31:22
4. Anuta Catuna (31, ROU) 2:29:46 9. Martha Tenorio (33, ECU) 2:31:49
5. Lornah Kiplagat (25, KEN) 2:30:12 10. Elana Meyer (33, RSA) 2:32:09

 

105th Boston Marathon – Monday, April 16, 2001

After an unprecedented 10 consecutive victories by Kenyans in the men’s race, Lee Bong-Ju of Korea halted the streak with his spectacular win at the 105th race. Lee finished 24 seconds ahead of Silvio Guerra of Ecuador. Kenyan Joshua Chelang’a rounded out the trio battling for the win over the final miles. Bong-Ju, the Olympic silver medalist at Atlanta, ran with a heavy heart but with inspiration to honor his recently departed father. American men made a resurgence as Rod DeHaven of Wisconsin captured sixth place with a personal-best time, California’s Josh Cox finished in 14th place, and Massachusetts native Mark Coogan crossed the finish line in 19th place. In the women’s race, Kenyan Catherine Ndereba’s runaway win was her second straight victory at Boston, and her time was the seventh-fastest in race history. Ndereba battled and surpassed three-time champion Fatuma Roba of Ethiopia (1997–99) over the Newton hills. In nearly perfect weather conditions (in the mid-50s with no tailwind) Winchester native Bobbi Gibb, the first woman to have completed the Boston Marathon (1966), fought through her bronchitis to finish on the 35th anniversary of her pioneering run.

Men

1. Lee Bong-Ju (30, KOR) 2:09:43   6. Rod DeHaven (34, WI) 2:12:41
2. Silvio Guerra (32, ECU) 2:10:07 7. Laban Nkete (30, RSA) 2:12:44
3. Joshua Chelang’a (28, KEN) 2:10:29 8. Fedor V. Ryjov (41, RUS) 2:13:54
4. David Kiptum Busienei (26, KEN). 2:11:47 9. Makhosonke Fika (29, RSA) 2:14:13
5. Mbarek Hussein (36, KEN) 2:12:01 10. Timothy Cherigat (24, KEN) 2:14:21

Women

1. Catherine Ndereba (28, KEN) 2:23:53   6. Irina Timofeyeva (31, RUS) 2:28:50
2. Malgorzata Sobanska (31, POL) 2:26:42 7. Ludmila Petrova (32, RUS) 2:29:23
3. Lyubov Morgunova (30, RUS) 2:27:18 8. Wei Yanan (20, CHN) 2:29:52
4. Lornah Kiplagat (26, KEN) 2:27:56 9. Bruna Genovese (24, ITA) 2:30:39
5. Fatuma Roba (27, ETH) 2:28:08 10. Kaori Tanabe (25, JPN) 2:31:31

106th Boston Marathon – Monday, April 15, 2002

In his Boston debut, Rodgers Rop from Kenya reclaimed the men’s title for his country with his winning time of 2:09:02. Rop led a 1-2-3-4 finish of Kenyan men, with countryman Christopher Cheboiboch finishing just three seconds back for second place. Women’s winner Margaret Okayo of Kenya set a course record of 2:20:43, eclipsing Uta Pippig’s 1994 record-setting run of 2:21:45 by more than one minute. Amid a heavy mist that limited visibility and in humid conditions (96% humidity, 57 degrees), Okayo also defeated defending champion and world-record holder Catherine Ndereba in their eagerly anticipated first marathon match-up against each other. Ndereba finished runner-up in 2:21:12. Keith Dowling of Virginia was the first American finisher (15th overall) in a personal best time of 2:13:28. Massachusetts native Jill Gaitenby was the top American woman for the second consecutive year (2:38:55, 13th woman). In the women’s masters race, Firaya Sultanova-Zhdanova of Russia broke the 14-year-old course record set by Priscilla Welch (2:30:48) by two minutes, 50 seconds with her 2:27:58 victory over the defending masters champion, Denmark’s Gitte Karlshoj. It was the fastest marathon by a female masters runner on U.S. soil (U.S. all-comers record). On the men’s side, Kenyan Joshua Kipkemboi reclaimed the masters title from rival Fedor Ryshov of Russia, finishing in 2:12:48. With 16,936 entrants, the 2002 race was a compelling commemoration of Patriots’ Day as runners and spectators alike demonstrated their patriotism along the route and in special pre-race ceremonies.

Men

1. Rodgers Rop (26, KEN) 2:09:02   6. Elias Chebet (28, KEN) 2:10:40
2. Christopher Cheboiboch (25, KEN) 2:09:05 7. Simon Bor (33, KEN) 2:11:39
3. Fred Kiprop (28, KEN) 2:09:45 8. Getachew Kebede (19, ETH) 2:11:39
4. Mbarek Hussein (37, KEN) 2:09:45 9. Luis Fonseca (25, VEN) 2:11:49
5. Lee Bong-Ju (31, KOR) 2:10:30 10. Silvio Guerra (33, ECU) 2:12:28

Women

1. Margaret Okayo (25, KEN) 2:20:43†   6. Bruna Genovese (25, ITA) 2:29:02
2. Catherine Ndereba (29, KEN) 2:21:12 7. Nuta Olaru (31, ROU) 2:30:26
3. Elfenesh Alemu (25, ETH) 2:26:01 8. Mai Tagami (22, JPN) 2:32:00
4. Sun Yingjie (23, CHN) 2:27:26 9. Gitte Karlshoj (42, DEN) 2:35:01
5. Firaya Sultanova-Zhdanova (40, RUS) 2:27:58≠ 10. Yukari Komatsu (28, JPN) 2:35:34

† Course Record ≠ Masters Course Record

107th Boston Marathon – Monday, April 21, 2003

Kenyan dominance was the story of the day in the men’s race with Robert K. Cheruiyot emerging as the winner in 2:10:11. The top five men were from Kenya, and defending champion Rodgers Rop (also of Kenya) was seventh. The winner in the 40-and-older division was Russia’s 43-year-old Fedor Ryzhov, who was sixth overall in a time of 2:15:29 which was the highest place by an over-40 runner since New Zealand’s John Campbell finished fourth in 1990 with a time of 2:11:04. Svetlana Zakharova, the 32-year-old Russian national record-holder, survived an early cat-and-mouse game with Kenyan Margaret Okayo, the Boston Marathon course record-holder, to pull away in the Newton Hills, winning in 2:25:20. Three American women finished in the top 10 here for the first time since 1993, and were led by Marla Runyan of Oregon (fifth; 2:30:28). The commemoration of Patriots’ Day was visible throughout race day and along the route, including a fly-over of two F-15s prior to the race start; a patriotic red-white-and-blue design of the start and finish lines; large American flags on display throughout the start area, on the course, and at the finish; as well as a display of U.S. Armed Forces flags at the finish line. For the first time since 1990 (13 years), the B.A.A. adjusted the qualifying standards, which affected runners 45 years of age and older and reflected a desire and an ability to accommodate more participants.

Men

1. Robert K. Cheruiyot (24, KEN) 2:10:11   6. Fedor Ryzhov (43, RUS) 2:15:29
2. Benjamin Kosgei Kimutai (32, KEN) 2:10:34 7. Rodgers Rop (27, KEN) 2:16:14
3. Martin Lel (24, KEN) 2:11:11 8. David Kiptum Busienei (28, KEN) 2:16:16
4. Timothy Cherigat (26, KEN) 2:11:28 9. Elly Rono (32, KEN) 2:17:00
5. Christopher Cheboiboch (26, KEN) 2:12:45 10. Laban Kipkemboi (25, KEN) 2:17:50

Women

1. Svetlana Zakharova (32, RUS) 2:25:20   6. Albina Ivanova (25, RUS) 2:30:57
2. Lyubov Denisova (31, RUS 2:26:51 7. Firaya Sultanova-Zhdanova (41, RUS) 2:31:30
3. Joyce Chepchumba (32, KEN) 2:27:20 8. Milena Glusac (27, CA) 2:37:32
4. Margaret Okayo (26, KEN) 2:27:39 9. Jill Gaitenby (36, RI) 2:38:19
5. Marla Runyan (34, OR 2:30:28 10. Esther Kiplagat (36, KEN) 2:38:43

108th Boston Marathon – Monday, April 19, 2004

In the most significant change to the women’s race since females were officially permitted to compete (1972) and prize money was instituted (1986), the top 35 entrants began in Boston’s first elite women’s start at 11:31 a.m., 29 minutes prior to the noon start. The new format was marked by a duel for the ages as defending world champion Catherine Ndereba, of Kenya, chased Ethiopian Elfenesh Alemu for the first 16 miles before pulling away for good with exactly one mile to go. Ndereba’s third victory and 16-second margin over Alemu tied the closest winner/runner-up finish in women’s race history. Timothy Cherigat, of Kenya, pulled three other countrymen up and over Heartbreak Hill before breaking loose on the famous landmark’s downslope. The fourth-place finisher from the previous year, Cherigat added to his homeland’s dominance of the men’s race since 1988: He became the ninth different Kenyan male to win and Kenyans have won 14 of the 17 races since 1988. At 45 years old, Joshua Kipkemboi won the masters division for the third time and became the oldest champion since the division was formalized in 1975. Ramilia Burangulova was victorious among female masters, marking the third consecutive victory by a Russian and the third consecutive year that the masters champion also finished among the top 10 overall. The weather — with the temperature at 83 degrees at the start and 86 by mid-afternoon at the finish – was the other major story. Despite a record number of runners treated for heat-related illnesses, 93 percent of the field finished (20,404 entrants; 18,003 starters; 16,783 finishers). While it was the hottest Patriots’ Day since 1976, an accurate long-range forecast gave participants and race management ample time to adjust their game day plans.

Men

1. Timothy Cherigat (27, KEN) 2:10:37   6. Benjamin Kosgei Kimutai (33, KEN) 2:17:45
2. Robert Cheboror (25, KEN) 2:12:21 7. Joshua Kipkemboi (45, KEN) 2:18:23
3. Martin Lel (25, KEN) 2:13:38 8. Andrew Letherby (30, AUS) 2:19:31
4. Stephen Kiogora (29, KEN) 2:14:34 9. Fedor Ryzhov (44, RUS) 2:21:24
5. Hailu Negussie (24, ETH) 2:17:30 10. Elly Rono (33, KEN) 2:22:45

Women

1. Catherine Ndereba (31, KEN) 2:24:27   6. Lyubov Denisova (32, RUS) 2:31:17
2. Elfenesh Alemu (28, ETH) 2:24:43 7. Malgorzata Sobanska (34, POL) 2:32:23
3. Olivera Jevtic (26, SCG) 2:27:34 8. Victoria Klimina (28, RUS) 2:33:20
4. Jelena Prokopcuka (27, LAT) 2:30:16 9. Ramilia Burangulova (42, RUS) 2:34:08
5. Nuta Olaru (33, ROU) 2:30:44 10. Ai Yamamoto (25, JPN) 2:34:32

109th Boston Marathon – Monday, April 18, 2005

In a rematch, Catherine Ndereba won an unprecedented fourth women’s race, pulling away from runner-up Elfenesh Alemu in the final miles to triumph in 2:25:13 and nearly two minutes ahead of her Ethiopian challenger. Ndereba trailed by as much as 1:20 by 20-kilometers, but began her comeback and picked up those 80 seconds over the next seven miles, catching Alemu at the crest of Heartbreak Hill. Meanwhile, an unheralded Hailu Negussie outlasted the field, capturing Ethiopia’s first men’s open title in 16 years. Negussie pushed the pack – including 2004 champion Timothy Cherigat and 2003 champion Robert K. Cheruiyot – through 35 kilometers and eventually won the battle of attrition in 2:11:45 on another warm day (70-degrees Fahrenheit at the start; 69-degrees at the finish). American Alan Culpepper was fourth in 2:13:39, which was the highest U.S. showing since 1987. Also of note, the field of finishers was the second-largest in event history (17,564), and a marathon for U.S. soldiers was held concurrently in Iraq in celebration of Patriots’ Day.

Men

1. Hailu Negussie (25, ETH) 2:11:45   6. Timothy Cherigat (28, KEN) 2:15:19
2. Wilson Onsare (28, KEN) 2:12:21 7. Benjamin Kipchumba (29, KEN) 2:15:26
3. Benson Cherono (20, KEN) 2:12:48 8. Andrew Letherby (31, AUS) 2:16:38
4. Alan Culpepper (32, CO) 2:13:39 9. Mohamed Quaadi (36, FRA) 2:16:41
5. Robert K. Cheruiyot (26, KEN) 2:14:30 10. Peter Gilmore (27, CA) 2:17:32

Women

1. Catherine Ndereba (32, KEN) 2:25:13   6. Lyubov Morgunova (34, RUS) 2:33:24
2. Elfenesh Alemu (29, ETH) 2:27:03 7. Shitaye Gemechu (25, ETH) 2:33:51
3. Bruna Genovese (28, ITA) 2:29:51 8. Zhor El Kamch (32, MAR) 2:36:54
4. Svetlana Zakharova (34, RUS) 2:31:34 9. Mina Ogawa (30, JPN) 2:37:34
5. Madina Biktagirova (40, RUS) 2:32:41 10. Nuta Olaru (34, ROU) 2:37:37

110th Boston Marathon – Monday, April 17, 2006

For the third year, the elite women enjoyed a earlier start, and the result was the closest finish in the history of Boston’s women’s division. Rita Jeptoo (2:23:38) pulled away from Jelena Prokopcuka (2:23:48) and Reiko Tosa (2:24:11) over the final miles, as the trio ran the eighth, 10th and 12th fastest times in Boston history. Not to be outdone, the men followed with a thrilling race of their own. A large pack followed the scorching early pace, with Benjamin Maiyo of Kenya and Meb Keflezighi of the United States taking the leaders through the half in 1:02:43, more than two minutes faster than Cosmas Ndeti’s course-record run in 1994. As the pace slowed, 2003 Boston champ Robert K. Cheruiyot asserted himself, shadowing Maiyo through the Newton hills. Finally, in the 21st mile, he made his move and set out against the clock, reaching the finish a scant one second under Ndeti’s previous record. Following Keflezighi, third in 2:09:56, was a string of strong U.S. performances, as five American men placed in the top 10. With 19,682 finishers, the 110th Boston Marathon was the second largest in history, and marked the first time that the race utilized a two-wave start. The first 10,000 runners began at the traditional noon starting time, with the remainder of the field starting at 12:30 p.m. Also a first, the race was scored using net, rather than gun, time.

Men

1. Robert K. Cheruiyot (27, KEN) 2:07:14†   6. Kenjiro Jitsui (37, JPN) 2:11:32
2. Benjamin Maiyo (27, KEN) 2:08:21 7. Peter Gilmore (28, CA) 2:12:45
3. Meb Keflezighi (30, CA) 2:09:56 8. William Kiplagat (33, KEN) 2:13:26
4. Brian Sell (28, MI) 2:10:55 9. Wilson Onsare (29, KEN) 2:13:47
5. Alan Culpepper (33, CO) 2:11:02 10. Clint Verran (30, MI) 2:14:12

Women

1. Rita Jeptoo (25, KEN) 2:23:38   6. Alevtina Biktimirova (23, RUS) 2:26:58
2. Jelena Prokopcuka (29, LAT) 2:23:48 7. Olivera Jevtic (28, SCG) 2:29:38
3. Reiko Tosa (29, JPN) 2:24:11 8. Madina Biktagirova (41, RUS) 2:30:06
4. Bruna Genovese (29, ITA) 2:25:28 9. Olesya Nurgalieva (29, RUS) 2:30:16
5. Kiyoko Shimahara (29, JPN) 2:26:52 10. Zivile Balciunaite (27, LTU) 2:32:16

† Course Record

111th Boston Marathon – Monday, April 16, 2007

The second largest Boston Marathon in history (23,869 entrants; 20,339 finishers) was threatened by some of the most extreme weather in the race’s history. Heavy rains and severe winds hit Boston in the early morning hours of race day, however by the time the starting gun sounded the wet and windy weather had calmed enough for the race to go on. The presence of the top three female marathoners in the world from 2006, Jelena Prokopcuka, Rita Jeptoo and Deena Kastor, made this one of the strongest women’s fields in Boston history. Emerging at the end, though, was Russian Lidiya Grigoryeva, who won in a time of 2:29:18, followed closely by Prokopcuka, who was runner-up for the second year in a row. The men’s race played out more to form, as course record holder Robert K. Cheruiyot held off fellow Kenyans James Kwambai and Stephen Kiogora. Though he crossed the finish line almost seven minutes slower than his course record of 2006, Cheruiyot nonetheless captured his third Boston crown, joining a select group of three-time champions. Along with Boston and Chicago in 2006, the win was Cheruiyot’s third straight in World Marathon Majors competition. Also, for the first time ever, Boston served as the U.S. Women’s Marathon Championship. Four American women, led by Kastor, placed in the top 10.

Men

1. Robert K. Cheruiyot (28, KEN) 2:14:13   6. Benjamin Maiyo (28, KEN) 2:16:04
2. James Kwambai (24, KEN) 2:14:33 7. Ruggero Pertile (32, ITA) 2:16:08
3. Stephen Kiogora (32, KEN) 2:14:47 8. Peter Gilmore (29, CA) 2:16:41
4. James Koskei (38, KEN) 2:15:05 9. Samuel Ndereba (30, KEN) 2:17:04
5. Teferi Wodajo (25, ETH) 2:15:06 10. Robert Cheboror (28, KEN) 2:18:07

Women

1. Lidiya Grigoryeva (33, RUS) 2:29:18   6. Robe Tola Guta (20, ETH) 2:36:29
2. Jelena Prokopcuka (30, LAT) 2:29:58 7. Alice Chelangat (30, KEN) 2:38:07
3. Madai Perez (27, MEX) 2:30:16 8. Ann Alyanak (28, OH) 2:38:55
4. Rita Jeptoo (26, KEN) 2:33:08 9. Kristin Price (25, NC) 2:38:57
5. Deena Kastor (34, CA 2:35:09 10. Mary Akor (30, CA) 2:41:01

112th Boston Marathon – Monday, April 21, 2008

In one of the most remarkable weekends of racing that Boston has ever seen, the 112th Boston Marathon
set off from Hopkinton just 24 hours after the U.S. Olympic Team Trials—Women’s Marathon, run through
the streets of Boston and Cambridge, had determined the U.S. Olympic team. While Deena Kastor thrilled
marathon fans on Sunday with her Olympic Trials win, on Monday it was Boston veteran Robert K.
Cheruiyot and rookie Dire Tune picking up where Kastor had left off. Tune and Alevtina Biktimirova broke
away from the women’s field, which included past champs Rita Jeptoo and Lidiya Grigoryeva, and battled
all the way to Boylston Street. After trading the lead repeatedly over the final miles, Tune finally began to
pull away in the last quarter mile, becoming Boston’s youngest women’s champion since Joan Benoit in
1979. Cheruiyot again proved that he is currently unrivaled in his mastery of the Boston course, winning
his third consecutive and fourth career title. In doing so, he joined Clarence DeMar (seven victories), Gerard
Cote (four victories), and Bill Rodgers (four victories), as the only men to have won Boston at least four times.
Registration for the 112th Boston Marathon had to be closed in late February because the 25,000 person
field had already filled.

Men

1. Robert K. Cheruiyot (29, KEN) 2:07:46   6. Timothy Cherigat (31, KEN) 2:14:13
2. Abderrahime Bouramdane (30, MAR) 2:09:04 7. Christopher Cheboiboch (31, KEN) 2:14:47
3. Khalid El Boumlili (30, MAR) 2:10:35 8. James Kwambai (25, KEN) 2:15:52
4. Gashaw Asfaw (29, ETH) 2:10:47 9. James Koskei (39, KEN) 2:16:07
5. Kasime Adillo (29, ETH) 2:12:24 10. Nicholas Arciniaga (24, MI) 2:16:13

Women

1. Dire Tune (22, ETH) 2:25:25   6. Bruna Genovese (31, ITA) 2:30:52
2. Alevtina Biktimirova (25, RUS) 2:25:27 7. Nuta Olaru (37, ROU) 2:33:56
3. Rita Jeptoo (27, KEN) 2:26:34 8. Robe Tola Guta (21, ETH 2:34:37
4. Jelena Prokopcuka (31, LAT) 2:28:12 9. Lidiya Grigoryeva (34, RUS) 2:35:37
5. Askale Tafa Magarsa (23, ETH 2:29:48 10. Stephanie Hood (27, CAN) 2:44:44

113th Boston Marathon – Monday, April 20, 2009

For the second consecutive year, the Boston Marathon added new events to Marathon Weekend. On Sunday, nearly 4,000 people toed the Boylston Street start line for the inaugural B.A.A. 5K. Registration for the first-time event filled within days. Afterwards, some of the fastest mile runners in the country took part in the B.A.A. Invitational Mile. Additionally, the 16 fastest boys and girls from the eight towns through which the Marathon course runs took part in the Scholastic Invitational Mile. Both events served as a thrilling appetizer for Mondays’ entrée. Monday was a day for the B.A.A. record book, as Salina Kosgei of Kenya waited until the last minute to push past defending champion Dire Tune of Ethiopia and top American Kara Goucher. Kosgei won the women’s race in the closest finish in race history, out-pacing Tune by one second in a photo-finish. In the men’s race, Deriba Merga of Ethiopia ran confidently and with a strong lead for the last few miles, becoming the first Ethiopian to win the Boston Marathon since 2005. On race day, there were 26,331 official entrants and 22,843 finishers, the second highest totals in race history — including a record 10,934 female entrants and 9,298 female finishers. The B.A.A. and principal sponsor John Hancock Financial Services increased the 2009 prize purse to a total of $806,000.

Men

1. Deriba Merga (28, ETH) 2:08:42   6. Gashaw Asfaw (30, KEN) 2:10:44
2. Daniel Rono (30, KEN) 2:09:32 7. Solomon Molla (22, ETH) 2:12:02
3. Ryan Hall (26, CA) 2:09:40 8. Evans Cheruiyot (26, KEN) 2:12:45
4. Tekeste Kebede (27, ETH) 2:09:49 9. Stephen Kiogora (34, KEN) 2:13:00
5. Robert Cheruiyot (20, ETH) 2:10:06 10. Timothy Cherigat (32, KEN) 2:13:04

Women

1. Salina Kosgei (32,KEN) 2:32:16   6. Lidiya Grigoryeva (35, RUS) 2:34:20
2. Dire Tune (23, ETH) 2:32:17 7. Atsede Habtamu (21, ETH) 2:35:34
3. Kara Goucher (30, OR) 2:32:25 8. Colleen De Reuck (45, CO) 2:35:37
4. Bezunesh Bekele (26, ETH) 2:33:08 9. Alice Timbilili (26, KEN) 2:36:25
5. Helena Kirop (32, KEN) 2:33:24 10. Alina Ivanova (40, FL) 2:36:50

114th Boston Marathon – Monday, April 19, 2010

Robert Kiprono Cheruiyot from Kenya ran from Hopkinton to Boston 82 seconds faster than anyone in Boston Marathon history. With a time of 2:05:52, he beat Robert Kipkoech Cheruiyot’s (no relation) 2006 record of 2:07:14. Teyba Erkesso of Ethiopia survived a late surge by Tatyana Pushkareva of Russia for a three second victory, finishing with a time of 2:26:11. Over three years, the women’s race was decided by a combined six seconds. In the men’s push rim wheelchair division, Ernst Van Dyk of South Africa earned his ninth title and became the most successful Boston Marathon competitor of all time. With a time of 1:26:53, he beat countryman Krige Schabort by three seconds in the second-closest finish in Men’s Wheelchair Division history. Marking 25 years of race partnership, prinicpal sponsor John Hancock Financial provided $806,000 in prize money, and Cheruiyot received an additional $25,000 for setting the course record. Through runners in the Boston Marathon, the Official Charity Program surpassed the $100 million mark since its inception in 1989, with $10.2 raised in 2010.

Men

1. Robert Kiprono Cheruiyot (21, KEN) 2:05:52*   6. Gashaw Asfaw (31, ETH) 2:10:53
2. Tekeste Kebede (28, ETH) 2:07:23 7. John Komen (32, KEN) 2:11:48
3. Deriba Merga (29, ETH) 2:08:39 8. Moses Kigen Kipkosgei (27, KEN) 2:12:04
4. Ryan Hall (27, CA) 2:08:41 9. Jason Lehmkuhle (32, MN) 2:12:24
5. Mebrahtom Keflezighi (34, CA) 2:09:26 10. Alejandro Suarez (29, MEX) 2:12:33

Women

1. Teyba Erkesso (27, ETH) 2:26:11   6. Lidiya Grigoryeva (36, RUS) 2:30:31
2. Tatyana Pushkareva (24, RUS) 2:26:14 7. Yurika Nakamura (24, JPN) 2:30:40
3. Salina Kosgei (33, KEN) 2:28:35 8. Weiwei Sun (25, CHN) 2:31:14
4. Waynishet Girma (24, ETH) 2:28:36 9. Nailya Yulamanova (29, RUS) 2:31:48
5. Bruna Genovese (33, ITA) 2:29:12 10. Albina Mayorova-Ivanova (32, RUS) 2:31:55

115th Boston Marathon – Monday, April 18, 2011

Men's winner Geoffrey Mutai from Kenya ran the world's fastest marathon in 2:03:02. Moses Mosop finished his debut in the marathon distance in a time of 2:03:06, the next fastest time in marathon history. Caroline Kilel of Kenya and Desiree Davila of the United States exchanged surges on Boylston Street with Kilel emerging as the winner by two seconds with a time of 2:22:36. Now, over the previous four years, the women's race has been decided by a combined eight seconds. Wakako Tsuchida of Japan won her fifth consecutive title in the women's wheelchair division with her world's fastest performance of 1:34:06. Her time beat Jean Driscoll's mark of 1:34:22 which she established in 1994. Masazumi Soejima won his second Boston Marathon in a time of 1:18:50, finishing one second better than Australian Kurt Fearnley and Ernst Van Dyk of South Africa, who finished second and third, respectively. Sponsored by John Hancock Financial, more than $806,000 in prize money was awarded by the B.A.A. to the top finishers. In addition to their first place prize money earnings, men's champion Geoffrey Mutai and women's wheelchair division champion Wakako Tsuchida received a combined $92,500 in bonus awards for their respective world's fastest performances. The 24 Boston Marathon Official Charities, through runners in the 115th Boston Marathon, combined to raise more than $10.2 million dollars. Together with principal sponsor John Hancock Financial's Non-profit bib program, the total amount of funds raised was $15.5 million dollars.

Men

1. Geoffrey Mutai (29, KEN) 2:03:02#   6. Robert Kiprono Cheruiyot (22, KEN) 2:06:43
2. Moses Mosop (25, KEN) 2:03:06 7. Philip Kimutai Sanga (27, KEN) 2:07:10
3. Gebregziabher Gebremariam (26, ETH) 2:04:53 8. Deressa Chimsa (34, ETH) 2:07:39
4. Ryan Hall (28, CA) 2:04:58* 9. Bekana Daba (22, ETH) 2:08:03
5. Abreham Cherkos (21, ETH) 2:06:13 10. Robert Kipchumba (27, KEN) 2:08:44

Women

1. Caroline Kilel (30, KEN) 2:22:36   6. Dire Tune (25, ETH) 2:25:08
2. Desiree Davila (27, MN) 2:22:38 7. Werknesh Kidane (29, ETH) 2:26:15
3. Sharon Cherop (27, KEN) 2:22:42 8. Yolanda Caballero (29, COL) 2:26:17
4. Caroline Rotich (26, KEN) 2:24:26 9. Alice Timbilili (28, KEN) 2:26:34
5. Kara Goucher (32, OR) 2:24:52 10. Yuliya Ruban (27, UKR) 2:27:00

116th Boston Marathon – Monday, April 16, 2012

To go along with the theme of the day, the 116th running of the Boston Marathon was certainly a hotly contested battle between some of Kenya's best. In the men's race, it came down to the last few miles, with Wesley Korir pulling away from Levy Matebo to win in 2:12:40 to 2:13:06; the fourth slowest winning time in the past 35 years. The women's race was not to be outdone in last gasp moments as well, with Kenya's Sharon Cherop bursting ahead just after the turn onto Boylston Street to take home the victory in 2:31:50; the seventh slowest time in the past 35 years. Second place went to Kenya's Jemima Jelagat Sumgong in 2:31:52. In the last five years, the women's race has been decided by a combined time of ten seconds. The heat did not slow everyone down, as Canada's Joshua Cassidy not only dominated the wheelchair competition, but also broke Ernst Van Dyk's course record with a time of 1:18:25. Australian Kurt Fearnly had to once again settle for runner-up placing with his time of 1:21:39. The women's wheelchair race was similar to the women's open race, with Arizona's Shirley Reilly just outlasting defending champion Wakako Tsuchida, 1:37:36 to 1:37:37. Through John Hancock Financial's sponsorship for the 27th year, more than $813,000 in prize money was awarded by the B.A.A. to the top finishers, including the course record bonus presented to Joshua Cassidy. The Boston Marathon Charity Program, now in its 24th year of enabling selected charitable organizations to raise millions of dollars for worthwhile causes, together with the 31 current participating charities, raised more than $11 million.

Men

1. Wesley Korir (29, KEN) 2:12:40   6. Laban Korir (26, KEN) 2:15:29
2. Levy Matebo (22, KEN) 2:13:06 7. Michel Butter (26, NED) 2:16:38
3. Bernard Kipyego (25, KEN) 2:13:13 8. David Barmasai (23, KEN) 2:17:16
4. Jason Hartmann (31, CO) 2:14:31 9. Hideaki Tamura (23, JPN) 2:18:15
5.Wilson Chebet (26, KEN) 2:14:56 10. Mathew Kisorio (22, KEN) 2:18:15

Women

1. Sharon Cherop (28, KEN) 2:31:50   6. Rita Jeptoo (31, KEN) 2:35:53
2. Jemima Jelagat Sumgong (27, KEN) 2:31:52 7. Mayumi Fujita (28, JPN) 2:39:11
3. Georgina Rono (31, KEN) 2:33:09 8. Nadezdha Leonteva (27, RUS) 2:40:40
4. Firehiwot Dado (28, ETH) 2:34:56 9. Genet Getaneh (26, ETH) 2:42:11
5. Diana Sigei (24, KEN) 2:35:40 10. Sheila Croft (37, WA) 2:48:31

117th Boston Marathon – Monday, April 15, 2013

It was a glorious day to run, with temperatures in the 50s and minimal winds. The men’s field chose to approach the first half of the race more tactically than the conditions offered. However, it was Kenya’s Micah Kogo, Ethiopia’s Gebre Gebremariam, and his countryman Lelisa Desisa who eventually emerged as contenders. Gebremariam tried to make a break in the final mile, but Desisa was more than ready. He accelerated into an overdrive that his combatants simply could not match. At the line, the time of 2:10:22 was reflective of the early cautionary tactics; but, it also revealed a dominating seven second margin over the second placed Kogo and eight over Gebremariam in third. On the women's side, several newcomers to Boston took a chance to run away with the race in the early miles. But it was a familiar face that ultimately came out on top. Returning to the site of her 2006 victory, Kenya's Rita Jeptoo turned onto the final stretch with a comfortable lead. Jeptoo's winning time of 2:26:25 was 33 seconds ahead of runner-up Meseret Hailu of Ethiopia. 2012 champion Sharon Cherop (KEN) was third, in 2:27:01. The men's wheelchair was one for the ages, as Japan's Hiroyuki Yamamoto won over nine-time champion Ernst Van Dyk (RSA), 1:25:32 to 1:27:12. Yamamoto, 46, became the oldest champion in Boston Marathon history. On the women's side, Tatyana McFadden (USA) slowly pulled away from Sandra Graf (SUI) on the hills in Newton, breaking the tape at 1:45:25. Graf finished second in 1:46:54. Through John Hancock Financial's sponsorship for the 28th year, more than $805,000 in prize money was awarded by the B.A.A. to the top finishers. The Boston Marathon Charity Program, in its 25th year of enabling selected charitable organizations to raise millions of dollars for worthwhile causes, together with the 32 participating charities, raised a record $12.8 million.

Men

1. Lelisa Desisa (23, ETH) 2:10:22   6. Markos Geneti (28, ETH) 2:12:44
2. Micah Kogo (26, KEN)) 2:10:27 7. Dickson Chumba (26, KEN) 2:14:08
3. Gebregziabher Gebremariam (28, ETH) 2:10:28 8. Jeffrey Hunt (30, AUS) 2:14:28
4. Jason Hartmann (32, CO) 2:12:12 9. Daniel Tapia (26, CA) 2:14:30
5. Wesley Korir (30, KEN) 2:12:30 10. Craig Leon (28, OR) 2:14:38

Women

1. Rita Jeptoo (32, KEN) 2:26:25   6. Kara Goucher (34, OR) 2:28:11
2. Meseret Hailu (22, ETH) 2:26:58 7. Madai Perez (33, MEX) 2:28:59
3. Sharon Cherop (29, KEN) 2:27:01 8. Diane Nukuri-Johnson (28, BDI) 2:29:54
4. Shalane Flanagan (31, OR) 2:27:08 9. Ana Dulce Felix (30, POR) 2:30:05
5. Tirfi Tsegaye (28, ETH) 2:28:09 10. Sabrina Mockenhaupt (32, GER) 2:30:09